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i often populate data reader with data and populate UI like this way

using (SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection("myConnString"))
using (SqlCommand comm = new SqlCommand("Select * from employee where salary<5000", conn))
{
    conn.Open();

    SqlDataReader reader = comm.ExecuteReader();

    if (reader.HasRows)
    {
        while (reader.Read())
        {
            // here i populate my employee class
        }
    }
    // here i update UI
}

i was searching for the use of Task Parallel library with DataReader and found piece of code. it looks nice but objective is not very clear to me. so here is the code i got.

public IEnumerable<MyDataClass> ReadData()
{
using (SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection("myConnString"))
using (SqlCommand comm = new SqlCommand("myQuery", conn))
{
    conn.Open();

    SqlDataReader reader = comm.ExecuteReader();

    if (reader.HasRows)
    {
        while (reader.Read())
        {
            yield return new MyDataClass(... data from reader ...);
        }
    }
}
}

calling like

Parallel.ForEach(this.ReadData(), data =>
{
// Use the data here...
});

OR

this.ReadData().AsParallel().ForAll(data => 
{
// Use the data here...
});

how could i get the data from ForAll.

can anyone help me to understand the code snippet that how it works and how to get data from ForAll and how can i populate my UI from ForAll.

another question that how do i know that which class is thread safe or not. what does it mean thread safe. a person said datareader is not thread safe. how he knows.

another question when one should use task parallel library. please guide. thanks

share|improve this question
3  
If you are want to use TPL 'just to use it' while you don't have a performance problem, then I wouldn't bother. It makes thinks more complex than you can imagine at the moment. –  Maarten Aug 14 '12 at 9:15
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1 Answer

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You can find information about thread-safety of every type in the .NET base class library in the MSDN documentation. Most types are not thread-safe. SqlDataReader for instance, is not thread-safe, since it works on a single connection to the database.

However, Parallel.ForEach is a very clearer construct. You can't really iterate an IEnumerable with multiple thread simultaneously, and Parallel.ForEach doesn't do that. Although it spins up multiple threads and those multiple threads do iterate on the given IEnumerable, Parallel.ForEach ensures that only one thread at the time iterates the enumerable's IEnumerator. It operates on the assumption that processing elements takes more time than getting the items from the enumerable. Iterating the enumerable is a sequential operation.

This means that even if the underlying data source and the use of the SqlReader is not thread-safe, you can still process the items in parallel using the Parallel.ForEach. Unfortunately, the MSDN documentation isn't very explicit about this, but it has to be, since IEnumerator instances returned from GetEnumerator() methods are never thread-safe.

Still you have to make sure that the given Action<T> is thread-safe, of course.

You can see this behavior, using the following program:

public static IEnumerable<int> GetNumbers()
{
    for (int i = 0; i < 140; i++)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(
            "                          Enumerating " + 
            i + " at thread " +
            Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId);

        yield return i;
    }
}

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    Console.ReadLine();

    Parallel.ForEach(GetNumbers(), number =>
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Processing " + number + 
            " at thread " +
            Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId);

        Thread.Sleep(1);
    });
}
share|improve this answer
    
why u gave Thread.Sleep(1)? here. –  Thomas Aug 14 '12 at 10:40
    
To simulate that processing the items takes more time than reading the items. –  Steven Aug 14 '12 at 11:09
    
people often said that this class is not thread-safe like datareader is not thread-safe. may be they are right but i dont know which dotnet build-in classes are thread-safe or not. so i want to know how people detect that any specific class is thread-safe or not and what they try to mean thread-safe? help me to know how to detect class is thread-safe or not. thanks –  Thomas Aug 14 '12 at 20:39
2  
The MSDN documentation of each type explains if it is thread-safe or not. If it doesn't state explicitly, it usually isn't thread-safe. Thread-safe means that an instance of a type can be used simultaniously from multiple threads, without the chance that the state of that instance (or the whole system) gets corrupt. –  Steven Aug 14 '12 at 20:55
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