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I am working on dates in Java. I am finding out the difference between two dates.

public static void main(String[] args) {
    final Date futDate = new GregorianCalendar(2012, 8, 15, 0, 0, 0)
            .getTime();

    final Date currentDate = new GregorianCalendar().getTime();

    long diff = Math
            .round((futDate.getTime() - currentDate.getTime()) / 1000);

    System.out.println(diff / 86400 + " days");
    System.out.println((diff % 86400) / 3600 + " hrs");
    System.out.println(((diff % 86400) % 3600) / 60 + " mins");
    System.out.println((((diff % 86400) % 3600) % 60) % 60 + " secs");

}

Output: 31 days 8 hrs 37 mins 30 secs

Even though the date difference is less than a day, the output is more than 31 days.

Thx! Rahul.

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Maybe a couple of system.out or just debugging the application could have helped you out. –  Averroes Aug 14 '12 at 9:58

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

8 isn't current month number :)

months are numbered from 0

Java's dates are painful, so I suggest take a look at http://joda-time.sourceforge.net/

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1  
And that's why we have constants for this: Calendar.AUGUST (which is 7) docs.oracle.com/javase/1.5.0/docs/api/java/util/… –  Thilo Aug 14 '12 at 9:58
    
oh... Thx! I am using Calendar.AUGUST as suggested by duffymo. –  rahul Aug 14 '12 at 9:59
    
@rahul, good for you. remember that days start from 1 and months start from 0. That's just java... ;] –  dantuch Aug 14 '12 at 10:00
    
That's not just Java. Many languages/API do it this way (which of course does not make it any better). –  Thilo Aug 14 '12 at 10:01
1  
@Thilo I suppose it came from C, and was left that way in Java as well, as it was common way to do it... Anyway, common doesn't mean good. –  dantuch Aug 14 '12 at 10:03

Better yet, use the built in constants:

Calendar.AUGUST 
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Not that this is really useful, unless you are really hardcoding AUGUST into your code. Normally, you need to parse input data. Of course, DateFormat handles that. –  Thilo Aug 14 '12 at 10:00
    
Just answering the question as stated, Thilo. Of course it's not typical. –  duffymo Aug 14 '12 at 10:01

I am working on dates in Java.

You'd be much better off using Joda Time

I am finding out the difference between two dates.

Joda Time makes this really easy:

LocalDateTime start = ...;
LocalDateTime end = ...;
Period period = new Period(start, end, PeriodType.dayTime());

System.out.println(period.getDays() + " days");
System.out.println(period.getHours() + " hrs");
System.out.println(period.getMinutes() + " mins");
System.out.println(period.getSeconds() + " secs");
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You still need to set the months in start and end correctly, though. –  Thilo Aug 14 '12 at 10:02
    
@Thilo: True, but Joda Time uses sane bases :) –  Jon Skeet Aug 14 '12 at 10:04

The month is 0 based as described in the API

So you might want to set it to 7 instead of 8.

Also for duration calculation there is Joda Time a IMO pretty sophisticated time API.

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