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I have seen a question on here about this however it was old so I will ask again in case a solution now exists.

My issue is this. I have a database table which I wish to select from but I want to lock the rows that I have selected. The reason for this is that I may have another process running that will also want to select the same rows and I want to prevent this.

Imagine I have two processes doing the same thing. One performs a select and begins to perform its processing of the data. Then a few seconds later the next process comes along and does a select but because the rows aren't locked it also takes the same records and begins to process them. This is of course a bad situation to be in. In Oracle you can use SELECT FOR UPDATE which will take out a lock on the rows to prevent them from being used by the 2nd process. How can this be achieved in SQL Server 2008?

I should add that I can only use standard sql statements. I do not have access to procedures, functions etc. It has to be done via a simple statement. Its a long story and a design consideration that has been taken out of my hands. The solution must be able to be stored in a table, retrieved later and then run via the ADO objects in C# in particular assigned to a command object.

How can a lock be applied to this statement?

SELECT * 
FROM 
  (SELECT TOP (20) * 
   FROM [TMA_NOT_TO_ENTITY_QUEUE]  
   WHERE [TMA_NOT_TO_ENTITY_QUEUE].[STATE_ID] = 2 
   ORDER BY TMA_NOT_TO_ENTITY_QUEUE.ID) a
share|improve this question
    
You might use lock hint - select * from tbl (updlock) –  Nikola Markovinović Aug 14 '12 at 9:29
    
Use updlock or xlock hint (generally - updlock, but it depends on the exact task). –  oryol Aug 14 '12 at 9:34
    
How could this be applied to the statement I have added to my question? –  CSharpened Aug 14 '12 at 9:37
1  
After seeing your final edit, use nowait to return as soon as resource is found to be locked: select * from tbl (updlock, nowait) –  Nikola Markovinović Aug 14 '12 at 11:22
    
Thanks I will give that a try –  CSharpened Aug 14 '12 at 12:03

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You need to use one of the so-called table hints:

The update lock prevents other processes from attempting to update or delete the rows in question - but it does not prevent read access:

    SELECT TOP (20) * 
    FROM [TMA_NOT_TO_ENTITY_QUEUE] WITH (UPDLOCK)
    WHERE [TMA_NOT_TO_ENTITY_QUEUE].[STATE_ID] = 2 
    ORDER BY TMA_NOT_TO_ENTITY_QUEUE.ID

There's also an exclusive lock, but basically, the update lock should be enough. Once you've selected your rows with an update lock, those rows are "protected" against updates and writes until your transaction ends.

share|improve this answer
    
It seems you misplaced the WITH clause (it should be in FROM section). –  alexey Sep 3 '14 at 13:11
    
@alexey: absolutely right - fixed it - thanks! –  marc_s Sep 3 '14 at 14:18

by lock, what do you want to happend with the second process? If yo uwant it to wain until the first finishes, yo ucan totally do that using transaction isolation level.

try running this small test and you will understand:

Open a two new queries on SSMS (lets call it A and B from now one) and on A, create a simple table like this:

create table transTest(id int)
insert into transTest values(1)

now, do the following:

do select * from transTest in both of them. You will see the value 1

On A run:

set transaction isolation level read committed

On B run:

begin transaction
insert into transTest values(2)

On A run:

select * from transTest

you will see that the query wont finish because it is locked by the transaction on B

On B run:

commit transaction

Go back to A and you will see that the query finished

Repeat the test with set transaction isolation level read uncommitted on A you will see that the query wont be locked by the transaction

share|improve this answer
    
Hi thanks for the reply. I would like the second process to simply not be allowed access. I do not want it to wait for the 1st process to release the lock. I would rather it returned a resource busy exception for example so I can handle it myself and then wait a minute or two to run the process again. I have added my select above. –  CSharpened Aug 14 '12 at 9:39

You should wrap your processes in a transaction, and set the transaction isolation level appropriately (ie: Serializable)

SET TRANSACTION ISOLATION LEVEL SERIALIZABLE
BEGIN TRAN
     UPDATE yourtable...
     -- process 1
COMMIT TRAN

and

SET TRANSACTION ISOLATION LEVEL SERIALIZABLE
BEGIN TRAN
     UPDATE yourtable...
    -- process 2
COMMIT TRAN

This behaviour has been in SQL Server since time immemorial.

Other transaction isolation levels are available.

share|improve this answer
    
I should add that I can only use standard sql statements. I do not have access to procedures, functions etc. It has to be done via a simple statement. Its a long story and a design consideration that has been taken out of my hands. I will add that info to my initial question. –  CSharpened Aug 14 '12 at 9:27
    
@CSharpened You can initialize a transaction in your C# code (either via SqlConnection.BeginTransaction or the System.Transactions namespace depending on your infrastructure) - and set the Data.IsolationLevel in that statement - see msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/5ha4240h.aspx for example –  podiluska Aug 14 '12 at 9:32
    
Does the same go for transactions for Oracle or other databases? I only ask as my solution is being designed to be database agnostic so I cannot hardcode anything datasource specific. Again another decision taken out of my hands :) –  CSharpened Aug 14 '12 at 9:36

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