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I'm trying to work out why the parent DIV in the code below doesn't always fill the screen completely (100%), specifically when I reduce the width of the browser to be less than the width of the child DIV and scroll to the right (I see the parent DIV background is truncated).

Why does this happen and how can I make the parent div fill the whole width of the window?

Here's the html:

<!doctype html>
<html>
    <head>
        <link href="teststyle.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" />
    </head>
    <body>
        <div id="parent">
            <div id="child">
                <p>red background gets truncated when the horizontal scrollbar is present.</p>
            </div>
        </div>
    </body>
</html>

and this is my css:

* {
    margin:0;
    padding:0;
    border:0;
    }

#parent{
    background:red;
    padding: 20px 0;
}

#child{
    width:600px;
    margin:0px auto;
    background:yellow;
}

Firefox screenshot

I'm using windows, Firefox (latest), Chrome (latest), IE 9.

share|improve this question
    
Which browser and OS are you using? This doesn't happen to me (jsfiddle.net/VtgSq) –  davids Aug 14 '12 at 10:12
    
It won't in JS Fiddle, try cutting and pasting my code into a text editor and trying it in a web server on your system or something. It won't miss-behave if it's contained in a frame. –  ac7web Aug 14 '12 at 10:22
    
It works well in Safari and Chrome in Mac OS X –  davids Aug 14 '12 at 10:30

3 Answers 3

Give min-width: 600px to #parent ( minwidthof parent same as child width)

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/ZYLzs/2/

share|improve this answer
    
That fixed it but I still don't understand why... thanks though! –  ac7web Aug 14 '12 at 10:27
    
As parent does not have width, it inherits the width of it's parent , say body which is 100% of the screen. If the screen size is less than 600px, then the child occupies width of 600px, but still the parent gets the screen width. In order to avoid that , min-width of 600px is given to parent, so that at any screen size below 600px the parent should get a minimum width of 600px. Any screen size above it occupies screen width –  Shab Aug 14 '12 at 10:31
    
Child inherit the parent width, but parent does not get the child width. –  Shab Aug 14 '12 at 10:34
    
Understanding it requires the knowledge of min-width, width and max-width and how they works. –  Shab Aug 14 '12 at 10:36
    
Yeah I get all that - what I don't understand is why the browser (all browsers it seems) think of the size of the 'screen' as just the viewable space rather than the full 100% of the scrollable space - seems odd to me. –  ac7web Aug 14 '12 at 11:05

have you tried giving the parent the 100% width ?

#parent{
   background:red;
   padding: 20px 0;
   width:100%;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, makes no difference. –  ac7web Aug 14 '12 at 10:20
#parent{
    background:red;
    padding: 20px 0;
    width: 100%; /* add this */
}
share|improve this answer

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