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I'm wrapping a C api which has the following struct:

typedef struct Value
{
    union 
    {
        int i;
        const char* s;
        bool b;
        struct StructureMember_T* firstStructureMember
        double d;
    } value;
} Value_T;

I use a setter function to set values in this struct from C++.

class ValueSetter : public IValueSetter
{
public:
    explicit ValueSetter(Value_T* value) : _value(value)
    {
    }

    void operator()(int8_t v) const
    {
        _value->value.i = v;
    }

    ...

    void operator()(std::string& s) const
    {
        _value->value.s = s.c_str();
    }

    void operator()(Structure& s) const
    {
        _value->value.firstStructureMember = s.getFirstMember();
    }

private:
    Value_T* _value;
};

To deal with StructureMember_T*, I added the following class which I'm not happy with. For example, its interface is dependant on StructureMember_T from the c api. Any suggestion regarding another approach? I will be adding more functionality to the Structure class at a later date.

class Structure
{
public:
    explicit Structure(Value_T* firstMember)
        : _firstMember(firstMember)
    {
    }

    StructureMember_T* getFirstMember()
    {
        return _firstMember;
    }

    void setFirstMember(StructureMember_T* firstMember)
    {
        _firstMember = firstMember;
    }

private:
    StructureMember_T* _firstMember;
};
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1  
When assigning the std::string you'd probably want to copy the string (i.e. allocate a char array and do a strcpy) instead of assigning the internal string pointer – Asaf Aug 14 '12 at 10:17
    
Asaf: strdup() is easier than a manual allocation and copy. But apart from that you're right. – Constantinius Aug 14 '12 at 10:31
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Given the goal you have, I don't really see a problem with having a setter and a getter in the C++ API.

If you really wanted to hide that, I would suggest to simply make Value a friend of Structure and have the get/set methods as private.

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