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I'm trying to teach myself some better JS development practice, so I'm writing my latest VLE widget in a JavaScript object wrapper.

var TutorGroupPoints = {
    URL: 'http://staff.curriculum.local/frog/rewards.php',
    CurrentUser: UWA.Environment.user.id,
    Groups: { },
    Sorted: [ ],

    init: function() {
        /* retrieve all of the groups from Frog and store them in a variable */
        Frog.API.get('groups.getAll',
        {
            'onSuccess': function (data) { this.Groups = data; },
            'onError': function(err) { alert(err); }
        });         
    },

    yearClick: function(year) {
        alert( this.Groups );

        for (var i = 0; i < this.Groups.length; i++) {

            if (this.Groups[i].name.indexOf(year) == 0 && this.Groups[i].name.indexOf('/Tp') != -1) {
                var arrayToPush = { 'id': this.Groups[i].id, 'name': this.Groups[i].name };
                this.Sorted.push(arrayToPush);
            }
        }
    }

};

widget.onLoad = function(){
    TutorGroupPoints.init();

    $('#nav li a').click(function() {
        TutorGroupPoints.yearClick($(this).attr("id"));
    });
}

The Frog.API call retrieves information about students/staff from our VLE (Virtual Learning Environment).

What I'm trying to do is store this information (retrieved in a variable called data) in a class-scope variable for use with other functions.

I thought I'd done that by declaring the Groups variable early on then using data = this.Groups, but then when I run the yearClick function, this.Groups simply appears as [object Object] where data alerts as loads of objects, i.e. [object Object] [object Object] [object Object] [object Object] [object Object] [object Object] [object Object] [object Object] [object Object].

When I change Groups to [ ], the alert is entirely empty.

As such, I'm guessing that this is a scope problem. How can I store data from the Frog.API call in a variable which I can use with other functions? Previously I've just used functions, i.e. 'onSuccess': function (data) { someOtherFunction(data); }, but I don't think that's a very clean or practical way of doing it?

Thanks in advance,

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is a common mistake. Your success callback, being a function, changes the this context that code executes in. So in your callback, this no longer points to the TutorGroupPoints object.

Either cache a reference to the outer this outside the function...

init: function() {
    var that = this; // <-- caching outer this
    Frog.API.get('groups.getAll', {
        'onSuccess': function (data) { that.Groups = data; },
        'onError': function(err) { alert(err); }
    });         
}

or bind a copy of it passed in via a closure, in this case an immediately-executing function

init: function() {
    Frog.API.get('groups.getAll', {
        'onSuccess': (function(that) {
             return function (data) { that.Groups = data; }
        })(this), // <-- passing reference to outer this
        'onError': function(err) { alert(err); }
    });         
}
share|improve this answer
    
ha ha, we clash, again ;-) –  Alnitak Aug 14 '12 at 10:17
    
Not sure who won this time - they both say "2 mins ago". Perhaps we should draw up a shifts rota :) –  Utkanos Aug 14 '12 at 10:19
1  
FWIW, the this problem is nothing to do with the call being asynchronous. It's the fact that it uses an inner function. –  Alnitak Aug 14 '12 at 10:19
    
Mine was definitely first, by about 15 seconds. I saw mine say 1 minute ago when yours said 44 seconds –  Alnitak Aug 14 '12 at 10:20
2  
that.Groups (I wouldn't capitalise it - it's not a class) is a reference to, not a copy of, TutorGroupPoints.Groups, so they are one and the same, so no issue here. –  Utkanos Aug 14 '12 at 10:22

Your this variable is wrong inside the Frog callback. Use this instead:

init: function() {
    var self = this;  // reference for use inside closures
    /* retrieve all of the groups from Frog and store them in a variable */
    Frog.API.get('groups.getAll',
    {
        'onSuccess': function (data) { self.Groups = data; },
        'onError': function(err) { alert(err); }
    });         
}

Any time a function is called it is supplied a context (i.e. this). Inside your callback your this value is probably the global window object. Using the cached variable ensures that the original (outer) this is still accessible inside the closure.

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