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EDIT: Updated 21/09/12 for my own sanity... I can't believe this was ever a question (yay learning).

The console element threw me off the scent a little with this one. Just asserting (expecting) the Exception could have worked if I was just looking to check the error, not specifically the message. Logging console activity and checking the log would have worked. The system response idea detailed at the end of the post would have worked. There are tons of options for this kind of thing. Tons! My conclusion? Do whatever makes the most sense / is least brittle. As long as your scenarios are solid and you're proving behaviour, it's all good.


My BDD quest continues with a trivial console application in .NET (VS2010, SpecFlow and NUnit).

I'm at something of a roadblock with scenarios like this one:

Feature: Withdraw Money
Scenario: Insufficient Funds
Given I have a MoneyBox
And my MoneyBox contains £10
When I withdraw £20
Then the system should display an error message
And my MoneyBox should contain £10

Defining the context is fine, trying to withdraw the funds is fine. All of the associated unit tests are fine. Asserting the balance at the end is fine.

I would like to implement some .Withdraw() method like this:

//Assume the moneybox only contains £1 coins (hence int is ok)
public void Withdraw(int withdrawlAmount) throws InsufficientFundsException
{
if(this.balance >= withdrawlAmount)
{
this.balance -= withdrawlAmount;
}
else
{
throw new InsufficientFundsException();
}
}

I can unit test that code (via pass and fail condition tests).

However, I can't quite see, in the context of a console app, how to assert:

Then the system should display an error message

Any ideas, tips or references would be much appreciated.

EDIT 1:

N.B. my question is concerned solely with proving the error message via an acceptance test using BDD methodology. It feels like a context issue. Thanks again.

EDIT 2:

One approach might be to rethink the scenario, or rather its implementation. The MoneyBox code could be written as-is (unit-tested, not acceptance-tested pure BO), but its functionality could be wrapped in some context class:

Super Quick Example:

public class MoneyBoxDriver
{
private MoneyBox objMB
private SystemResponse objSR

//Standard stuff e.g. constructor

private void Withdraw(int withdrawAmount)
{
try
{
objMB.Withdraw(withdrawAmount);
}
catch(InsufficientFundsException)
{
this.objSR = new SystemResponse(SystemResponseEnum.FailedInsufficientFunds);
}
}

Then we can setup the MoneyBoxDriver as context, act on it via the Withdraw wrapper method and then assert the functionality by checking the MoneyBoxDriver’s SystemResponse.

Then the system should display an insufficient funds error message
...
Assert.That(MBDriver.SystemResponse.Type == SystemResponseEnum.FailedInsufficientFunds)
...

In the UI (the console) there could be simple code to display an error message IF the SystemResponse is of a given type.

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1  
In your else statement, have a MessageBox.Show("You do not have enough money for the transaction"); –  SemiDemented Aug 14 '12 at 11:05
1  
Thanks for your response, but given that the .Withdraw() method would be in the MoneyBox class, I'd be really uncomfortable putting ANYTHING to do with MessageBox or other UI components in there, even in this trivial example. The idea is that this serves as a scalable example of the bigger picture, as a learning process. In terms of the format of the error message, the console should just display a string. –  Tom Tom Aug 14 '12 at 11:36
    
I apologize, I misinterpreted your question. If you want to just let the conole display a string, would Console.Write("You do not have enough money for the transaction"); not work? –  SemiDemented Aug 14 '12 at 11:40
    
It's fine, I'm sorry if it's unclear - thanks for your input. To reiterate, my question is not about how to code this basic functionality (Console.Writeline will most definitely work). Rather, I'd like to establish how to prove it via acceptance testing using BDD methodology. –  Tom Tom Aug 14 '12 at 12:54
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1 Answer

This is part of the fun of any kind of test-first approach, it will force you to design your objects in a way that they can be tested - and they'll be better off for it!

In this example I'd consider doing the following: (Please note that the following code has not been tested, nor is it the "perfect" solution - but it is more testable and closer to where you want to be).

//Assume the moneybox only contains £1 coins (hence int is ok)
public void Withdraw(int withdrawlAmount, Action<InsufficientFundsException> handleException)
{
     if(this.balance >= withdrawlAmount)
     {
          this.balance -= withdrawlAmount;
     }
     else
     {
          handleException(new InsufficientFundsException());
     }
}

You can then in your test code have a field or property for a possible exception, and when you call the Withdraw method just specify a quick action to do the callback, eg:

moneyBox.Withdraw(10, e => this.WithdrawException = e);

Your Then statement can then assert that the WithdrawException was not null, and make asserts on the message within it.

Your production code (i.e. console application) would possibly do this instead:

moneyBox.Withdraw(10, e => Console.WriteLine("Error: {0}", e.Message));

The more perfect solution would be replacing the Action<InsufficientFundsException> with something like Action<MoneyBoxWithdrawResponse>, or something similar. Where MoneyBoxWithdrawResponse contain information on the success of the operation, perhaps the remaining balance and also any potential error/exception details.

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Agreed on the test-first approach! I can't believe I've written so much untested code to date. :| Scary stuff! You've got me thinking... I'm still reluctant to put anything unrelated to the MoneyBox in the MoneyBox class. What if the same class was implemented elsewhere, different system, different platform, different consuming code, etc. etc. etc. I've added an alternative solution to my original post, inspired by yours but quite different. Perhaps a combination of the two would be a better bet. –  Tom Tom Aug 14 '12 at 16:04
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