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I have hundreds of rows of data that look like this:

[[u' 16 '], [u'1x23'], [u'Mr Test', u' (5)'], [u'John Smith'], [u'54.5'], [], [u'10%'], [u'40%'], [u'$26,503']]

Some of the values are nested and some also are empty.

I'm trying to massage it to be like this:

['16', '1x23', 'Mr Test', '(5)', 'John Smith', '54.5', '', '10%', '40%', '$26,503']

I've tried some ideas found on here like flattening, including the following routine:

def traverse(o, tree_types=(list, tuple)):
    if isinstance(o, tree_types):
        for value in o:
            for subvalue in traverse(value):
                yield subvalue
    else:
        yield o

This worked for some tables I've already parsed but only when there are no empty values.

share|improve this question
    
for clarification, do you want empty values to result in "" as i have seen you write, or ignored? –  Inbar Rose Aug 14 '12 at 11:23
    
Show us the code you used to build data. Maybe we can suggest a way to build it in the form you want directly. –  unutbu Aug 14 '12 at 11:32
    
One thing to watch out for: not all of your sub-lists are the same size. Some have one element, and others have two; if you flatten the list, then you may lose relationships such as between columns of a file, and end up indexing the wrong thing. A better question is: what do you want to do with the list? There may be an alternate data structure worth considering. –  abought Aug 14 '12 at 11:41
    
Could you use some of the info here? stackoverflow.com/questions/2158395/… –  TakeS Aug 14 '12 at 11:43
1  
Whatever you do, don't look to see if this has been asked before: stackoverflow.com/… –  msw Aug 14 '12 at 11:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If your only problem is with empty values, you could check for it inside first if:

def traverse(o, tree_types=(list, tuple)):
    if isinstance(o, tree_types):
        if len(o) == 0:
            yield ''
        for value in o:
            for subvalue in traverse(value):
                yield subvalue
    else:
        yield o
share|improve this answer
    
awesome exactly what I needed. Thanks. –  croc Aug 14 '12 at 12:16

Try this,

sum((item or [""] for item in a), [])

Weird huh?

share|improve this answer
    
Nicely poached from stackoverflow.com/questions/952914/… ;) –  Rob Cowie Aug 14 '12 at 11:42
    
Actually I knew about it from long ago from #python –  Jakob Bowyer Aug 14 '12 at 11:43
    
I don't doubt it; I'm not being serious –  Rob Cowie Aug 14 '12 at 11:44
    
This drops the empty values. –  user647772 Aug 14 '12 at 11:44
1  
@Tichodroma fixed –  Jakob Bowyer Aug 14 '12 at 11:55

This will do the trick (even with empty values):

import operator
def flatten(a):
    return reduce(operator.add, a)
share|improve this answer
    
This drops the empty '' values. –  user647772 Aug 14 '12 at 11:43

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