Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a generic method

public static void DoSomething<T>()
{...}

. Now I want to restrict that T.

public static void DoSomething<T>() where T: IInterface1
{...}

But what I really want is allowing multiple interfaces, something like

public static void DoSomething<T>() where T: IInterface1, IInterface2
{...}

But that doesn't work. Compiler says something like

There's no implicit conversion from IInterface1 to IInterface2

There's no implicit conversion from IInterface2 to IInterface1

I thought about letting the classes implement a common interface which I can refer to but I don't have access to the classes.

What possibilities do I have to allow multiple Interfaces?

Thanks, Tobi

Edit: Here's what I wanted to do. I'm developing an Outlook-Add-In. I use this piece of code below quite often.

    public static object GetItemMAPIProperty<T>(AddinExpress.MAPI.ADXMAPIStoreAccessor adxmapiStoreAccessor, object outlookItem, uint property) where T: Outlook.MailItem, Outlook.JournalItem
    {
        AddinExpress.MAPI.MapiItem mapiItem;
        mapiItem = adxmapiStoreAccessor.GetMapiItem(((T)outlookItem));
        return mapiItem != null ? mapiItem.GetProperty(property) : null;
    }

The method GetMapiItem takes an object as long as it's one of Outlook's items (Journal, Mail, Contact,...). That's why I was restricting T. Because it cannot be, say, Outlook.MAPIFolder.

No I've changed the method to

    public static object GetItemMAPIProperty<T>(AddinExpress.MAPI.ADXMAPIStoreAccessor adxmapiStoreAccessor, T outlookItem, uint property)
    {
        AddinExpress.MAPI.MapiItem mapiItem;
        mapiItem = adxmapiStoreAccessor.GetMapiItem(((T)outlookItem));
        return mapiItem.GetProperty(property);
    }

but the developer (In this case I) can give it any Type because the method GetMapiItem accepts an object. I hope that makes sense. I'm not sure if it does for that example but I guess restricting a generic method to multiple Types (with OR) can be a good idea.

share|improve this question
    
What framework are you targeting, and are you compiling with Visual Studio, and which version? I have here VS 2008 with .NET 3.5 and the above compiles just fine. Are you sure what you are giving us as example is what you have. –  Ivan Zlatanov Jul 28 '09 at 16:30
1  
because in that way you say the compiler that T should be IInterface1 and IInterface2 not or –  ArsenMkrt Jul 28 '09 at 16:31
    
the code he provide works, he just need to say method to take parameter of type IInterface1 OR IInterface2 –  ArsenMkrt Jul 28 '09 at 16:34
    
@Ivan: I have the same setup, and if I don't call the method then it compiles fine. If I try to call it though, it complains that the type I give it isn't a subclass of both. The where given is an AND, the OP wants an OR. –  Sean Jul 28 '09 at 16:35
5  
OK, so suppose there were a way to do this. Suppose interface1 has method Foo and interface 2 has method bar. You cannot call Foo on T because it might be an i2, and you cannot call Bar on T because it might be an i1. Therefore this feature would prevent you from doing anything with T. And that's why we didn't implement it. –  Eric Lippert Jul 28 '09 at 20:36

6 Answers 6

Have Interface1 and Interface2 both derive from the same base interface. Ex:

    public static void DoSomething<T>() where T : ICommon
    {
        //...
    }

    public interface IInterface1 : ICommon
    {}

    public interface IInterface2 : ICommon
    { }

    public interface ICommon
    { }

The benefit of doing it this way is that you don't have to keep updating your DoSomething() definition every time you add a new interface that inherits from ICommon.

Edit: if you don't have control over the interfaces, you have a couple of options. Here's one thing that you could do...

    protected static class DoSomethingServer<T1> where T1 : class
    {

        //Define your allowed types here
        private static List<Type> AllowedTypes = new List<Type> {
            typeof(IInterface1),
            typeof(IInterface2)
        };

        public static MethodInvoker DoSomething()
        {
            //Perform type check
            if (AllowedTypes.Contains(typeof(T1)))
            {
                return DoSomethingImplementation;
            }
            else
            {
                throw new ApplicationException("Wrong Type");
            }
        }

        private static void DoSomethingImplementation()
        {
            //Actual DoSomething work here
            //This is guaranteed to only be called if <T> is in the allowed type list
        }
    }

Use as such:

DoSomethingServer<IInterface1>.DoSomething();

Unfortunately, this takes away compile time type safety and it will only blow up at runtime if you try feeding in the wrong type. Obviously this is less than ideal.

share|improve this answer
    
it could even be an empty placeholder interface, IStorable –  Gordon Gustafson Jul 28 '09 at 16:44
    
From the question: "I thought about letting the classes implement a common interface which I can refer to but I don't have access to the classes." Seems unlikely that the interfaces could be altered then. –  Daniel Earwicker Jul 28 '09 at 16:49

This compiles fine for me:

interface I1 { int NumberOne { get; set; } }
interface I2 { int NumberTwo { get; set; } }

static void DoSomething<T>(T item) where T:I1,I2
{
    Console.WriteLine(item.NumberOne);
    Console.WriteLine(item.NumberTwo);
}

So the syntax seems fine... perhaps its something else that's causing the problem.

share|improve this answer
2  
Have you tried using the method? –  James Jul 28 '09 at 16:35
2  
Of course this works in C#, it just does what it's supposed to: it defines a method that accepts only an item that supports BOTH interfaces. –  Daniel Earwicker Jul 28 '09 at 16:40
    
Ah, the comment I was replying to has disappeared. –  Daniel Earwicker Jul 28 '09 at 16:41
    
@Earwicker - That was my comment. I accidentally left it on the wrong answer. –  Robert Venables Jul 28 '09 at 16:45
    
@Earwicker - you're right. I'm missing the point..., nova wants "OR". You need two separate methods @James - oops. I get your point. –  Nader Shirazie Jul 28 '09 at 18:41

If you mean that the parameter can be either an implementation of I1 OR an implementation of I2, and they are unrelated types, then you cannot write one method group (i.e. overloads with the same method name) to handle both types.

You can't even say (borrowing from nader!):

    interface I1 { int NumberOne { get; set; } }
    interface I2 { int NumberTwo { get; set; } }

    static void DoSomething<T>(T item) where T : I1
    {
        Console.WriteLine(item.NumberOne);
    }

    static void DoSomething<T>(T item) where T : I2
    {
        Console.WriteLine(item.NumberTwo);
    }

    static void DoSomething<T>(T item) where T : I1, I2
    {
        Console.WriteLine(item.NumberOne);
        Console.WriteLine(item.NumberTwo);
    }

This would give the compiler a way to deal with every possibility without ambiguity. But to help with versioning, C# tries to avoid situations where adding/removing a method will change the applicability of another method.

You need to write two methods with different names to handle the two interfaces.

share|improve this answer
    
what if DoSomething should not take parameter? –  ArsenMkrt Jul 28 '09 at 16:42
    
Makes no difference. You need write a method for each interface, and give the methods different names. –  Daniel Earwicker Jul 28 '09 at 16:48
    
OR inheritance has a work around with the upcoming duck typing and C# 4.0 –  Maslow Jul 28 '09 at 17:37
    
+1 "You need to write two methods with different names to handle the two interfaces." –  Nader Shirazie Jul 28 '09 at 18:51

one way is to create an additional interface which extend both, Interface1 and 2. then you put this interface instead of the other 2.

that's one way to do it in java; if i remember correctly this should work as well in C#

hope that helps.

regards, tobi as well :P

share|improve this answer
    
You've got it backwards. This won't work in C#. –  Robert Venables Jul 28 '09 at 16:40
    
You'll get a compile time error: There is no implicit reference conversion from (IInterface1||IInterface2) to (Name of Interface That Extends Both). –  Robert Venables Jul 28 '09 at 16:42
    public interface IInterfaceBase
    {

    }
    public interface IInterface1 : IInterfaceBase
    {
      ...
    }
    public interface IInterface2 : IInterfaceBase
    {
      ...
    } 

    public static void DoSomething<T>() where T: IInterfaceBase
    {
    }

If you want T to be IInterface1 or IInterface2 use the code above

share|improve this answer
    
+1 this would do it, if he is just looking for both types to have some items in common. –  Maslow Jul 28 '09 at 17:38

Building off of what Earwicker said... names aren't the only way to go. You could also vary the method signatures...

public interface I1 { int NumberOne { get; set; } }
public interface I2 { int NumberTwo { get; set; } }

public static class EitherInterface
{
    public static void DoSomething<T>(I1 item) where T : I1
    {
        Console.WriteLine("I1 : {0}", item.NumberOne);
    }

    public static void DoSomething<T>(I2 item) where T : I2
    {
        Console.WriteLine("I2 : {0}", item.NumberTwo);
    }
}

Which when tested like this:

public class Class12 : I1, I2
{
    public int NumberOne { get; set; }
    public int NumberTwo { get; set; }
}

public class TestClass
{
    public void Test1()
    {
        Class12 z = new Class12();
        EitherInterface.DoSomething<Class12>((I1)z);
        EitherInterface.DoSomething<Class12>((I2)z);
    }
}

Yields this output:

I1 : 0
I2 : 0

This meets the goal of exposing a single method name to the caller, but doesn't help you since you aren't using parameters.

share|improve this answer
    
I could do that but I would have to write an implementation for each Interface. That's why I wanted to use generics in the first place. –  Tobias Jul 28 '09 at 18:06

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.