Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question already has an answer here:

In the python example below, methods and attributes seem to be out of scope but they still work, what is happening?

for module in output:
    a = 1
    attributes=[]
    methods=[]
    for branch in module[2]:

        for leaf in branch[2]:
            if leaf[0]=="method":
                methods.append(leaf[1]) 
            if leaf[0]=="attribute":
                attributes.append(leaf[1])
print methods
print attributes
print module[0]
print a

but if I outdent one more level it stops working

for filename in os.listdir("."):
    print filename
    fName, fExtension = os.path.splitext(filename)
    print fName, fExtension
    if fExtension == ".idl":
        f = open(filename)
        idl = f.read()
        f.close()
        output = parse(idl)
        pprint.pprint(output)
        root={}
        for module in output:
            a = 1
            attributes=[]
            methods=[]
            for branch in module[2]:
                for leaf in branch[2]:
                    if leaf[0]=="method":
                        methods.append(leaf[1]) 
                    if leaf[0]=="attribute":
                        attributes.append(leaf[1])
    print methods
    print module[0]

it says: NameError: name 'methods' is not defined I'm using python 2.7

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Martijn Pieters, delnan, Tim, Wooble, Bakuriu Mar 7 '13 at 17:48

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

6  
Only functions, classes, methods and modules create new scopes. –  Martijn Pieters Aug 14 '12 at 12:49
2  
Please see this Short Description of Python Scoping Rules –  kojiro Aug 14 '12 at 12:50
    
You could have also gone for leaf, try for z in (1,2,3): print z, then z. z is assigned and in scope! i.e. will return 3. List comprehensions on the other hand... stackoverflow.com/a/541958/201648 –  Aaron Newton Aug 14 '12 at 13:01
    
@AaronNewton -- List comprehensions behave differently in this regard depending on python version (2.x "leaks" the loop variable into the current scope where apparently python 3.x doesn't). –  mgilson Aug 14 '12 at 13:04
    
@mgilson true. I've just tested it under 2.7.3 and sure enough I get '9' >>> i = 0 >>> [i+1 for i in range(10)] [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10] >>> i 9 –  Aaron Newton Aug 14 '12 at 13:08

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

As indicated in the comments, for loops, while loops, if statements, etc. do not create a new scope. In fact, the only things that create a new scopes are functions, classes, modules and methods. Therefore, when you create a new variable inside a for loop, it is available outside of that loop because they share the same scope.

share|improve this answer
    
print module[0] isn't surprising if you take into account a few lines up: for branch in module[2]. It seems quite likely that output yields things supporting the sequence protocol (I'd put my money on tuples). –  lvc Aug 14 '12 at 13:15
    
I edited with more code example were it brakes –  Eduard Florinescu Aug 14 '12 at 13:16
1  
@EduardFlorinescu -- This probably breaks because fExtension == ".idl": probably evaluates to False. This means that the code in the if statement is never executed and that variable is never added to the scope (resulting in a NameError). –  mgilson Aug 14 '12 at 13:21
    
True. That's what happened. So we nee to be careful where the variable is defined, so practically there are other cases of scope by defining the variable in a specific condition or not. This I will keep in mind as a good practice even if the scope is overall local, don't use a variable out of the scope of a specific conditional evaluation if it was defined there. –  Eduard Florinescu Aug 14 '12 at 13:29
1  
@EduardFlorinescu -- No problem. We're happy to help. Hopefully you stick with Python long enough to love it as much as I do :^) –  mgilson Aug 14 '12 at 13:46

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.