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I have this select here:

select parent_id from sales_flat_order_status_history where status like '%whatever%' group by parent_id having count(parent_id) > 1

This query runs only some seconds. Now I want to use it in another select, like this:

select increment_id from sales_flat_order where entity_id in(
select parent_id from sales_flat_order_status_history where status like '%whatever%' group by parent_id having count(parent_id) > 1)

This runs forever, so I tried inserting the ids one by one:

select increment_id from sales_flat_order where entity_id in(329,523,756,761,763,984,1126,1400,1472,2593,3175,3594,3937,...)

This runs fast, where is the difference and how can I make my first approach work faster?

Thanks!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your query is taking a long time to run because it's executing the subquery and doing a lookup for every row sales_flat_order table.

A join will probably be quicker:

select increment_id 
from sales_flat_order
  inner join (select parent_id 
              from sales_flat_order_status_history 
              where status like '%whatever%' 
              group by parent_id having count(parent_id) > 1) Sub 
  on sales_flat_order.entity_id  = Sub.parent_ID

This forces the subquery to execute only once

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Yes, much faster indeed! Thanks –  user1540714 Aug 14 '12 at 13:07

Subqueries are processed in foreach style (for each row do subselect).

Thinks like in (1,2,3) don't use an index with some older versions of mysql.

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So I cant make this any faster? –  user1540714 Aug 14 '12 at 12:59

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