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I consider writing a class that behaves differently, depending on its construction method:

Example:

// #1 - Own an object
class MyClass {
    MyClass(std::string const& str) : m_str(str) {}

    std::string m_str;
}

// #2 - Share an object (Can be done by pointer as well)
class MyClass {
    MyClass(std::string& str) : m_str(str) {}

    std::string& m_str;
}
  1. Is this a good idea to have both behaviors in the same class?
  2. What is the best way to implement such a class?
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What are you actually trying to do? –  David Schwartz Aug 14 '12 at 12:58
    
I am trying to have a class that sometimes is responsible of the deallocation of its data and some other times it only references it and allows higher level logic to access it and deallocate it in time. –  Xyand Aug 14 '12 at 13:00
    
Ideally a class should be doing one "thing", not two. Have you considered managing deallocation separately from the higher level logic? For example always have a reference in MyClass and create a copy of the string just before constructing MyClass when it's necessary. –  Alexander Chertov Aug 14 '12 at 13:08
    
I did. It introduces potential problems. What if MyClass outlives str? –  Xyand Aug 14 '12 at 14:20

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try this:

struct MyClass
{
    std::unique_ptr<std::string> dont_touch_me;
    std::string & str;

    explicit MyClass(std::string const & s)
    : dont_touch_me(new std::string(s))
    , str(*dont_touch_me)
    { }

    explicit MyClass(std::string & r)
    : str(r)
    { }
};

Now just make sure you always use MyClass::str for everything.

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Thanks. Would you consider this a good design? –  Xyand Aug 14 '12 at 13:02
    
@Albert: That's impossible to answer out of context. If it fits and solves your problem, then I don't see an immediate reason not to use it... –  Kerrek SB Aug 14 '12 at 13:03
    
I think a named constructor would be more appropriate as I could own (copy) a non-const string if I want to. I also think that dont_touch_me should be a smart pointer as it might take unnecessary space if string is replaced by more complex class. –  Xyand Aug 14 '12 at 13:14
    
@Albert: You're right, I amended that. –  Kerrek SB Aug 14 '12 at 13:26
    
What about named constructor? Current implementation doesn't allow copying a non-const string. –  Xyand Aug 14 '12 at 14:25
struct ReferenceHolder
{
private:
    std::string& m_str;
public:
    ReferenceHolder(std::string& str) : m_str(str) {}
    // ... all other methods operating on m_str
};

struct ValueHolder : public ReferenceHolder
{
private:
    std::string m_str;
public:
    ValueHolder(const std::string& str) : ReferenceHolder(m_str), m_str(str) {}
};

This is not really a good idea to combine both behaviors in a single class, because objects constructed with non-const reference will make no use of internal string. If caller can decide whether to pass const or non-const reference to constructor, it must be of no difficulty to decide between two class names.

The overhead of holding both std::string and reference is rather small though. If you want to seamlessly pass around your object with string inside by value, then you should do it as Kerrek SB suggested.

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