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http://jsfiddle.net/ZLH7J/1/

What the jsFiddle and code below shows are two examples that essentially do the same thing. When trying to call first(); or this.first(); in either example, an undefined error is thrown. I can call the functions later through the instance, but not when trying to instantiate the object using init(){...}() like a constructor. I put init() at the bottom thinking it was an order of operations thing, but that is not the case. This does not work the way I thought it would work.

I am curious to understand how this is supposed to be done, and why this cannot be done.

//create and return an obj
var fishSticks = function(){
    return {
        first: function(){
            document.getElementById('output').innerHTML="Success";
        },
        init: function(){
            try{
                first(); //err
                this.first(); // also err
             }catch(e){
                document.getElementById('output').innerHTML=e.toString();
            }
        }()
    }
}   

//do function stuff and then return 'this'
var fishFillet = function(){
    var first = function(){
            document.getElementById('output2').innerHTML="Success";
    }
    var init = function(){
            try{
                first(); //err
                this.first(); // also err
             }catch(e){
                 document.getElementById('output2').innerHTML=e.toString();
            }
    }()
return this;
}

 var test = new fishSticks();    
 var test2 = new fishFillet();

share|improve this question
    
In the second example, you'll never be able to call test2.init() or test2.first(). They're not properties of any object. –  Pointy Aug 14 '12 at 13:01
1  
In the second example, calling first(); inside init should work. But the whole construct does not seem to make a lot of sense to me. Why are not using a simple constructor and directly execute the code in there? What is your overall goal? –  Felix Kling Aug 14 '12 at 13:01
    
I would only need test2.init() to fire once to fire once, when creating the obj, like a constructor. –  Tank Aug 14 '12 at 13:02

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to understand two things:

1) JavaScript does not automatically insert this like Java does, so the first() call will only look through the lexical scope for a definition of first, it will nok look at the this object. Therefore the call to first() should work but this will be bound to something else than what you might expect inside first.

2) Local variables in a constructor do not become members of the constructed object.

share|improve this answer
    
I learned oop in Java; it may be showing. Thanks, this helps my understanding. –  Tank Aug 14 '12 at 13:17

In your second example, if you comment out the call in "init" to this.first() then you get the "Success" message.

The first version doesn't work because JavaScript simply does not allow for references to be made within an under-construction object to the object itself. There's just no way to do it.

The second one works (well the simple reference to "first" works) because "first" is declared as a local variable. Local variables are not properties of any object, and in particular they're not properties of the object allocated when the function is called with new. That's why this.first() doesn't work.

In the second one, you could make this.first() work by declaring things differently:

var fishFillet = function(){
    this.first = function(){
            document.getElementById('output2').innerHTML="Success";
    }
    var init = function(){
            try{
                this.first(); //will work
             }catch(e){
                 document.getElementById('output2').innerHTML=e.toString();
            }
    }()
    return this;
}

Also, for what it's worth, the weird anti-pattern of

var something = function() { ... }

is not as useful as

function something() { ... }

There's no reason to use the var declaration instead of the function declaration.

share|improve this answer

How about...

var fishFillet = function () {
    var first = function () {
        document.write( 'Success' );
    };

    var init = function () {
        first();
    };

    init();

    return {
        first: first
    };
};

And then:

var ff = fishFillet(); // calls init() which calls first()
ff.first(); // call first() manually

Live demo: http://jsfiddle.net/uaCnv/

So, first you define all your functions, next you manually invoke init, and last you return an object containing those functions which should be available through the resulting object (as methods).

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Since you are using both as a constructor, format them as such:

function fishFillet(){
    this.first = function(){
        document.getElementById('output2').innerHTML="Success";
    }
    this.init = function(){
        try{
            this.first();
        }catch(e){
            document.getElementById('output2').innerHTML=e.toString();
        }
    }
}
var food = new fishFillet();
food.init();

The reason it wasn't working for you is b/c "first" is created as a local varaible, and is deleted after execultion. Init isn't being called until after the execution of the constructor has finished

share|improve this answer
    
I did not know var vars would be deleted, which makes the difference between this.vars and var vars = ... then return this quite significant. –  Tank Aug 14 '12 at 13:20

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