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And if they are, How to stop that?

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use prototype scope –  Jigar Parekh Aug 14 '12 at 13:10
    
why do you want to stop it ? –  NimChimpsky Aug 14 '12 at 13:15

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It depends on the scope of the bean being annotated. If it is of scope singleton, then it the same instance will be used everywhere in the Spring ApplicationContext. If it is of scope prototype, then a new instance will be used in each location.

<bean id="id" class="some.NewObject" scope="prototype"/>
<bean id="id2" class="some.AnotherNewObject" scope="singleton"/>

These bean definitions coupled with the following code will help to illustrate.

class Class1 {
    @Autowired
    some.AnotherNewObject obj;
}

class Class2 {
    @Autowired
    some.AnotherNewObject obj;
}

class Class3 {
    @Autowired
    some.NewObject obj;
}

class Class4 {
    @Autowired
    some.NewObject obj;
}

Class1 and Class2 will receive a reference to the same instance of some.AnotherNewObject. Class3 and Class4 will receive references to different instances of some.NewObject.

If you are using annotations and package scanning for configuration, then you can can use the @Scope annotation to specify your scope:

@Component
@Scope("prototype")
class NewObject {
    ...
}

@Component
@Scope("singleton")
class AnotherNewObject {
    ...
}
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1  
Good, but how do it change the scope in annotation? –  AhHatem Aug 14 '12 at 13:16
    
What do you mean, can you give some more context? You cannot change the scope of a bean using the @Autowired annotation. –  nicholas.hauschild Aug 14 '12 at 13:17
    
but you can change the scope with annotation on the bean itself –  NimChimpsky Aug 14 '12 at 13:20
    
Thanks, that is what I was looking for. –  AhHatem Aug 14 '12 at 13:21
@Service
@Scope("prototype")
public class CustomerService 
{}
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I do not understand why prototype/singleton.// are not declared as enums by Spring. –  Eugene Aug 14 '12 at 17:38
    
@Eugene for this reason : stackoverflow.com/a/11741450/106261 –  NimChimpsky Aug 14 '12 at 19:31
    
I do agree on that post, where the answer talks about value of a page inside a Controller, but here we could use an enum for PROTOTYPE, which will be a compile time constant, the Scope annotation would take into for example an ENUM as input, not a String. For example GeneratedValue from Hibernate does that. –  Eugene Aug 14 '12 at 19:40
    
You cannot use an enum because Scope, a Spring class, is extensible. I can define my own Scope and register it with Spring's ApplicationContext, and at that point, it can be used within Spring's @Scope annotation. –  nicholas.hauschild Aug 14 '12 at 22:48

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