Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm new to numpy and having trouble trying to filter a subset of a sample.

I've got a matrix with the shape (1000, 12). That is, a thousand samples, with 12 data columns in each. I'm willing to create two matrices, one with all the outliers in the sample, and the other with all the elements which are not outliers; The resulting matrices should have this shape:

norm.shape     = (883, 12)
outliers.shape = (117, 12)

To identify an outlier, I'm using this condition:

cond_out  = (dados[0:,RD_EVAL] > _max_rd) | (dados[0:,DUT_EVAL] > _max_dut)

That is, for each line in the matrix, I'm looking for the values of two columns. If one of them is above a certain threshold, then the line is considered an outlier. The point is, this condition has a shape (1000,), so when I compress the original matrix, I get a (117,) result. How could I filter the matrix so the result would be (117,12), that is, a matrix with all the lines that are outliers, but with all the data columns in each of them?

share|improve this question

migrated from stats.stackexchange.com Aug 14 '12 at 13:16

This question came from our site for people interested in statistics, machine learning, data analysis, data mining, and data visualization.

add comment

2 Answers

import numpy as np

d=np.random.randn(4,4)

array([[ 1.16968447, -0.07650322, -0.30519481, -2.09278839],
       [ 0.53350868, -0.8004209 ,  0.38477468,  1.31876924],
       [ 0.06461366,  0.82204993,  0.42034665,  0.30473843],
       [ 1.13469745, -1.47969242,  2.36338208, -0.33700972]])

Lets filter all the lines that are less than zero in the second column:

d[:,1]<0
array([ True,  True, False,  True], dtype=bool)

You see, you get a logical array that you can use to select the desired rows:

d[d[:,1]<0,:]

array([[ 1.16968447, -0.07650322, -0.30519481, -2.09278839],
       [ 0.53350868, -0.8004209 ,  0.38477468,  1.31876924],
       [ 1.13469745, -1.47969242,  2.36338208, -0.33700972]])
share|improve this answer
add comment

Maybe something like this would work?

>>> import numpy
>>> m = numpy.random.random(size=(1000,12))
>>> RD_EVAL = 7
>>> _max_rd = 0.9
>>> DUT_EVAL = 11
>>> _max_dut = 0.95
>>> cond_out = (m[:,RD_EVAL] > _max_rd) | (m[:,DUT_EVAL] > _max_dut)
>>> cond_out.shape
(1000,)
>>> 
>>> norm = m[~cond_out, :]
>>> outliers = m[cond_out,:]
>>> 
>>> norm.shape
(846, 12)
>>> outliers.shape
(154, 12)

See the docs on advanced indexing.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.