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i try to use std::map as property in my class. I use Visual Studio 2012, and my class is like:

public ref class MyClass
{
    std::map<std::wstring,MyType> * mpMyMap;
    MyClass()
{
mpMyMap = new std::map<std::wstring,MyType>();
}
~MyClass()
{
delete mpMyMap;
}
Get(std::wstring name)
{
    return mpMyMap[name];
} 
}

At return mpMyMap[name]; I get error, what there is no operator[] for this type. What should I do?

share|improve this question
1  
Why is mpMyMap a pointer? Do you need it to be a pointer (you probably dont't). If you do need it to be a pointer, you should use a smart pointer type to wrap it (like std::unique_ptr, or boost::scoped_ptr). – Chad Aug 14 '12 at 14:08
    
why std::map in C++/CLI? why not System::Collections::Generic::Dictionary? – ForEveR Aug 14 '12 at 14:22

the bracket operator is on the map, not on the pointer of a map...

Try : return (*mpMyMap)[name];

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The correct syntax is

MyType Get(std::wstring name)
{
    return (*mpMyMap)[name];
} 

You could also make the map an instance member instead of a pointer

std::map<std::wstring,MyType> mMyMap;

then your original code in Get would work and you'd get rid of memory management in the constructor and the destructor of MyClass.

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Use

return (*mpMyMap)[name];

or

return mpMyMap->operator[]( name );

P.S. What is this

  public ref class MyClass
//^^^^^^^^^^

Also, add return type for Get (MyType in your case)

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1  
It's not native C++, it's C++/CLI. – ForEveR Aug 14 '12 at 14:07
    
@ForEveR - I see, thanks. It was not marked with C++/CLI. – Kiril Kirov Aug 14 '12 at 14:07

mpMyMap is a pointer (for which I can see no reason), so you need to dereference it:

return (*mpMyMap)[name];

If mpMyMap must be a dynamically allocated remember to delete it in the destructor and either prevent copying of MyClass or implement copy constructor and assignment operator.

Note Get() is missing a return type (which should be either MyType or MyType&). Make the argument to Get() a const std::wstring& to avoid unnecessary copying and const as Get() does not modify it.

share|improve this answer

Since mpMyMap is pointer first variant is

Get(std::wstring name)
{
    return (*mpMyMap)[name];
}

And second

Get(std::wstring name)
{
    return mpMyMap->operator[](name);
}

And Get should have return-type.

share|improve this answer
1  
You may have your parens misplaced. Shouldn't it be (*mpMyMap)[name]? – Robᵩ Aug 14 '12 at 15:35
    
@Robᵩ yeah. Misprint. Thanks. – ForEveR Aug 14 '12 at 15:41

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