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I have written a Delphi function that loads data from a .dat file into a string list. It then decodes the string list and assigns to a string variable. The contents of the string use the '#' symbol as a separator.

How can I then take the contents of this string and then assign its contents to local variables?

// Function loads data from a dat file and assigns to a String List.
function TfrmMain.LoadFromFile;
var 
  index, Count : integer;
  profileFile, DecodedString : string;
begin
  // Open a file and assign to a local variable.
  OpenDialog1.Execute;
  profileFile := OpenDialog1.FileName;
  if profileFile = '' then
    exit;
  profileList := TStringList.Create;
  profileList.LoadFromFile(profileFile);
  for index := 0 to profileList.Count - 1 do
  begin
    Line := '';
    Line := profileList[Index];
  end;
end;

After its been decoded the var "Line" contains something that looks like this:

example:

Line '23#80#10#2#1#...255#'.

Not all of the values between the separators are the same length and the value of "Line" will vary each time the function LoadFromFile is called (e.g. sometimes a value may have only one number the next two or three etc so I cannot rely on the Copy function for strings or arrays).

I'm trying to figure out a way of looping through the contents of "Line", assigning it to a local variable called "buffer" and then if it encounters a '#' it then assigns the value of buffer to a local variable, re-initialises buffer to ''; and then moves onto the next value in "Line" repeating the process for the next parameter ignoring the '#' each time.

I think I have been scratching around with this problem for too long now and I cannot seem to make any progress and need a break from it. If anyone would care to have a look, I would welcome any suggestions on how this might be achieved.

Many Thanks

KD

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is the file single line or several #-delimited lines ? –  Arioch 'The Aug 14 '12 at 15:34
    
it seems you do not free profileList. That is memory leak. If you need to split file to lines before parsing each line, then u should use try-finally to free the object. Look at answer by @UweRaabe - and use the same pattern of creating and freeing profileList. The casing "profileList" suggests you came from Java land or such. Here is no garbage collection is Delphi. If you created something - you are responsible to free it. There are reference-counted interfaces though, like IJclStringList mentioned in my answer. They would be freed by compiler. –  Arioch 'The Aug 14 '12 at 15:35
    
If the file does not have multiple lines, but a single one, then you should read it into string variable rather than stringlist. –  Arioch 'The Aug 14 '12 at 15:36
    
" OpenDialog1.Execute;" - would you check result ? if user press "cancel" he would be very amused at the outcome... –  Arioch 'The Aug 14 '12 at 15:46
    
@Arioch'The, the more I feel you need a special tab for your comments here on StackOverflow. People then could simply read the question with the others comments and optionally switch to the tab with yours :-) –  TLama Aug 14 '12 at 16:26
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4 Answers

You need a second TStringList:

  lineLst := TStringList.Create;
  try
    lineLst.Delimiter := '#';
    lineLst.DelimitedText := Line;
    ...
  finally
    lineLst.Free;
  end;

Depending on your Delphi version you can set lineLst.StrictDelimiter := true in case the line contains spaces.

share|improve this answer
    
"Depending on your Delphi version" - that's what i hate about this approach. Just emotionally dislike :-) –  Arioch 'The Aug 14 '12 at 15:02
    
Thanks for the reply - I should have said the version was XE2. –  kvnDalley Aug 14 '12 at 15:20
3  
@Arioch'The, the Delphi version only matters when you need StrictDelimiter, which is only necessary when there are spaces in the line data. Without that spaces are treated as delimiter, too. –  Uwe Raabe Aug 14 '12 at 17:29
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You can do something like this:

program Project1;

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

{$R *.res}

uses
  System.SysUtils, StrUtils;

var
  S : string;
  D : string;

begin
  S := '23#80#10#2#1#...255#';

  for D in SplitString(S,'#') do //SplitString is in the StrUtils unit
    writeln(D);

  readln;
end.
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You did not tag your Delphi version, so i don't know if it applies or not. That IS version-specific. Please do!

In order of my personal preference:

1: Download Jedi CodeLib - http://jcl.sf.net. Then use TJclStringList. It has very nice split method. After that you would only have to iterate through.

function Split(const AText, ASeparator: string; AClearBeforeAdd: Boolean = True): IJclStringList;

uses JclStringLists;
...
var s: string;  js: IJclStringList.
begin
...
   js := TJclStringList.Create().Split(input, '#', True);
   for s in js do begin
      .....
   end;
...
end;

2: Delphi now has somewhat less featured StringSplit routine. http://docwiki.embarcadero.com/Libraries/en/System.StrUtils.SplitString It has a misfeature that array of string type may be not assignment-compatible to itself. Hello, 1949 Pascal rules...

uses StrUtils;
...
var s: string;  
    a_s: TStringDynArray; 
(* aka array-of-string aka TArray<string>. But you have to remember this term exactly*)
begin
...
   a_s := SplitString(input, '#');
   for s in a_s do begin
      .....
   end;
...
end;

3: Use TStringList. The main problem with it is that it was designed that spaces or new lines are built-in separators. In newer Delphi that can be suppressed. Overall the code should be tailored to your exact Delphi version. You can easily Google for something like "Using TStringlist for splitting string" and get a load of examples (like @Uwe's one).

But you may forget to suppress here or there. And you may be on old Delphi,, where that can not be done. And you may mis-apply example for different Delphi version. And... it is just boring :-) Though you can make your own function to generate such pre-tuned stringlists for you and carefully check Delphi version in it :-) But then You would have to carefully free that object after use.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry I should have said Delphi XE2. Thanks for your reply. –  kvnDalley Aug 14 '12 at 15:19
    
I think better not "say" but add delphi-xe2 tag. You're welcome. –  Arioch 'The Aug 14 '12 at 15:29
    
"input" is string. You should read the whole file into it, but i am sure you can google how to do it. Loading file into stringlist is wrong, because you told you don;'t need splitting on different lines. It would be fragile and slower then needed. –  Arioch 'The Aug 14 '12 at 15:32
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I use a function I've written called Fetch. I think I stole the idea from the Indy library some time ago:

function Fetch(var VString: string; ASeperator: string = ','): string;
var   LPos: integer;
begin
  LPos := AnsiPos(ASeperator, VString);
  if LPos > 0 then
  begin
    result := Trim(Copy(VString, 1, LPos - 1));
    VString := Copy(VString, LPos + 1, MAXINT);
  end
  else
  begin
    result := VString;
    VString := '';
  end;
end;

Then I'd call it like this:

var
  value: string;
  line: string;
  profileFile: string;
  profileList: TStringList;
  index: integer;
begin
  if OpenDialog1.Execute then
  begin 
    profileFile := OpenDialog1.FileName;
    if (profileFile = '') or not FileExists(profileFile) then
      exit;

    profileList := TStringList.Create;
    try
      profileList.LoadFromFile(profileFile);

      for index := 0 to profileList.Count - 1 do
      begin
        line := profileList[index];
        Fetch(line, ''''); //discard "Line '"
        value := Fetch(line, '#')
        while (value <> '') and (value[1] <> '''') do //bail when we get to the quote at the end
        begin
           ProcessTheNumber(value); //do whatever you need to do with the number
           value := Fetch(line, '#');
        end;
      end;
    finally
      profileList.Free;
    end;
  end;
end;

Note: this was typed into the browser, so I haven't checked it works.

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