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For the following code lines:

public class Base{

    private int num1 = 0;
    private int num2 = 0;
    private static int dif = 0;

    public Base(int num){
         this(num,num+1);
         System.out.println("Base constructor1");
    }

    public Base(int num1, int num2){
         System.out.println("Base constructor2");
         this.num1 = num1;
         this.num2 = num2;
         dif = num2 - num1;
    }

    public int sum(){
        return num1 + num2;
    }

    public static int getDif(){
        return dif;
    }
}

What should those 2 lines print ?

Base b1 = new Base(10);
Base b2 = new Base(4,7);

I think that if I'll understand the following line: this(num,num+1); I will understand everything...

thnx

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Do try and indent your code. Makes it much easier to read –  Nick Miceli Aug 14 '12 at 14:39
1  
this(num,num+1); calls public Base(int num1, int num2) –  NimChimpsky Aug 14 '12 at 14:40
1  
If you step through your code in a debugger you can see what each line does. –  Peter Lawrey Aug 14 '12 at 14:54
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6 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted
this(num,num+1);

calls following constructor in same object

public Base(int num1, int num2){

Why?

If user created an object for Base by calling constructor with single param, your code does some default calculations in above constructor and sets num2 and diff values.

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The first statement Base b1 = new Base(10); is an example of constructor chaining and it would produce following result -

Base constructor2 

Base constructor1

And second one is simple. It would print

Base constructor2
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+1 for answering the actual question. "What would those 2 lines print?" –  km1 Aug 15 '12 at 13:52
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Since you are passing one integer parameter in the first call:

Base b1 = new Base(10);

It will call the constructor with only one integer parameter and print out:

Base constructor1

The second call passes in two integer parameters so it will call the constructor with two integer parameters and print out:

Base constructor2

I suggest testing things yourself, trying things can be the easiest way to learn and understand better.

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When you call a function that has multiple definitions, like

public Base(int num)

vs

public Base(int num1, int num2)

The one chosen is based on what parameters you use. So, by calling

new Base(5);

You'll hit the first constructor, with only a single int.

This constructor says, "well, I want both defined, but I only have one number. Lets call the second constructor, and just make num2 equal to this first number plus one.

this(num,num+1); //num == 5

calls

Base(int num1, int num2)

where num1 == 5 which was provided, and num2 == 6, which was the provided number plus 1.

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If you were to run those two lines you would see...

Base constructor2
Base constructor1
Base constructor2

In your console because the first object declaration would call one constructor then the other, while the second declaration would only call the second constructor.

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Base b1 = new Base(10);
Base b2 = new Base(4,7);

This will print out:

Base constructor2

Base constructor1

Base constructor2

Since the constructors are chained, the first constructor is called with the instantiation of b1 (public Base(int num1)) which calls the other constructor (public Base(int num1, int num2)), which prints out "Base constructor2", then the execution returns to print out "Base constructor1".

b2 is then instantiated and only prints out "Base constructor2" because the constructor that is used does not chain to another constructor.

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@Lunar: I believe I was in the middle of updating when you posted this comment, thanks. –  Chris Dargis Aug 14 '12 at 14:47
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