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I have a NSMutable array with elements inserted like this:

[availableSeatsArray addObject:[NSString stringWithString:num_available]];

I want to remove the elements in the array that have values of zero or lower. I tried checking the element's value using its int value and even its string value, but it always passes the '0' element case. Console output of the array before and after below.

for (int i=0;i<[availableSeatsArray count]; i++) {
        if ([[availableSeatsArray objectAtIndex:i] intValue] <= 0 || ([[availableSeatsArray objectAtIndex:i] isEqualToString:@"0"])) {
            NSLog(@"Removed index: %d", [[availableSeatsArray objectAtIndex:i] intValue]);
            [availableSeatsArray removeObjectAtIndex:i];
        }
}

Console output:

Available array: (
    "-2",
    10,
    5,
    "-5",
    0,
    10,
    10,
)
2012-08-14 11:13:28:002 -[dmbAddReservation viewWillAppear:] [Line 1074] Removed index: -2
2012-08-14 11:13:28:004 -[dmbAddReservation viewWillAppear:] [Line 1074] Removed index: -5
2012-08-14 11:13:28:006 -[dmbAddReservation viewWillAppear:] [Line 1083] Available array: (
    10,
    5,
    0, // I cannot explain why this element was not removed
    10,
    10,
)
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1  
That's why you shouldn't modify the array while enumerating it. –  user529758 Aug 14 '12 at 15:24
1  
+1 @H2CO3, don't modify while enumeration is in progress. Make a new array by filtering the elements you want. –  Ravi Aug 14 '12 at 15:28
    
...or modify the original array while enumerating a copy of the array ;) –  NicolasMiari Aug 14 '12 at 15:30
    
@NicolasMiari or change the if into a while (that's how I usually do it). –  user529758 Aug 14 '12 at 15:31
    
(...there's even an exception thrown in Cocoa when during fast enumeration, an NSMutableArray or dictionary is changed...) –  user529758 Aug 14 '12 at 15:32

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem is that this approach uses a fundamentally flawed logic. It erronously doesn't remove consecutive occurrences of 0 or negative objects. The reason is, when in the for loop you check for "-5", it passes the test, then you remove it, shrinking the array, and shifting its remaining elements so that the "0" will now be in the place of the "-5". But in the for loop, you advance the loop variable (i in this case) regardless of whether an element was or wasn't removed, so now 'i' points one past the zero. And it wouldn't be checked. Solution: only increase the loop variable if there are no consecutive elements that pass your test (i. e. change the if to while):

for (int i = 0; i < [availableSeatsArray count]; i++) {
    while ([[availableSeatsArray objectAtIndex:i] intValue] <= 0
       || ([[reservatiomAvailableArray objectAtIndex:i] isEqualToString:@"0"])) {
        NSLog(@"Removed index: %d", [[availableSeatsArray objectAtIndex:i] intValue]);
        [availableSeatsArray removeObjectAtIndex:i];
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, good sir! –  anuragbh Aug 14 '12 at 15:39
    
@anuragbh you're welcome. –  user529758 Aug 14 '12 at 15:40

A couple of points.

  1. Try using integerValue instead of intValue
  2. Rather than store the string representation of a number in your array, just use an NSNumber instead. That's what it's for.
  3. Avoid mutating your arrays while you iterate through them.

So you create your array with:

[availableSeatsArray addObject:[NSNumber numberWithInteger:[num_available integerValue]]];

And then you can filter them out (note I'm using the block based enumeration methods):

__block NSMutableArray *itemsToRemove;
[availableSetsArray enumerateObjectsUsingBlock:^(id obj, NSUInteger idx, BOOL *stop) {
    if ([obj integerValue] == 0]) {
        [itemsToRemove addObject:obj]
    }
}];

// Now that you've selected which objects to remove you can actually remove them.
[availableSetsArray removeObjectsInArray:itemsToRemove];
share|improve this answer
    
+1, this is also an elegant solution. –  user529758 Aug 14 '12 at 15:40

It's skipping that element because you're removing the -5 before it. i increments to the next value, and that index is now occupied by the first 10. There are probably several ways around this, but the first that comes to mind is filteredArrayUsingPredicate: (see the NSArray documentation).

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I would go for NSPredicate and predicateWithBlock:. For NSMutableArray you can use filterUsingPredicate: method which will remove unneeded objects from your array without creating a new one. The following code will do it:

NSMutableArray *arr = [NSMutableArray arrayWithObjects:@"0",@"1",@"2", @"-50", nil];
NSPredicate *predicate = [NSPredicate predicateWithBlock:^BOOL(NSString* evaluatedObject, NSDictionary *bindings) {
    return [evaluatedObject compare:@"0" options:NSNumericSearch] > 0;
}];
[arr filterUsingPredicate:predicate];
NSLog(@"%@", arr);
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