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I'm trying to calculate the total, mean and median of an array thats populated by input received by a textfield. I've managed to work out the total and the mean, I just can't get the median to work. I think the array needs to be sorted before I can do this, but I'm not sure how to do this. Is this the problem, or is there another one that I didn't find? Here is my code:

import java.applet.Applet;
import java.awt.Graphics;
import java.awt.*;
import java.awt.event.*;

public class whileloopq extends Applet implements ActionListener
{
    Label label;
    TextField input;
    int num;
    int index;
    int[] numArray = new int[20];
    int sum;
    int total;
    double avg;
    int median;



    public void init ()
    {
        label = new Label("Enter numbers");
        input = new TextField(5);
        add(label);
        add(input);
        input.addActionListener(this);
        index = 0;
    }

    public void actionPerformed (ActionEvent ev)
    {
        int num = Integer.parseInt(input.getText());
        numArray[index] = num;
        index++;
        if (index == 20)
        input.setEnabled(false);
            input.setText("");
        sum = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < numArray.length; i++)
        {
            sum += numArray[i];
        }
        total = sum;
        avg = total / index;

        median = numArray[numArray.length/2];



        repaint();

    }



    public void paint (Graphics graf)
    {



        graf.drawString("Total   = " + Integer.toString(total), 25, 85);
        graf.drawString("Average = " + Double.toString(avg), 25, 100);
        graf.drawString("Median = " + Integer.toString(median), 25, 115);



    }
}
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8 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The Arrays class in Java has a static sort function, which you can invoke with Arrays.sort(numArray).

int[] sortedArray = Arrays.sort(numArray);
int index;
double median;
if (numArray.length % 2 == 0)
    median = ((double)numArray[numArray.length/2] + (double)numArray[numArray.length/2 - 1])/2;
else
    median = (double) numArray[numArray.length/2];
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3  
For arrays numArray with an even number of elements, your code snippet computes the wrong median. For example, for an input like [5, 6, 7, 10], it computes the median to be the average of the 2th and 3rd element (zero-based indices!), yielding (7+10)/2 – while it should be (6+7)/2. –  Hbf May 19 '13 at 18:26
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Arrays.sort(numArray);
int middle = ((numArray.length) / 2);
if(numArray.length % 2 == 0){
 int medianA = numArray[middle];
 int medianB = numArray[middle-1];
 median = (medianA + medianB) / 2;
} else{
 median = numArray[middle + 1];
}

EDIT: I initially had medianB setting to middle+1 in the even length arrays, this was wrong due to arrays starting count at 0. I have updated it to use middle-1 which is correct and should work properly for an array with an even length.

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Nope, that is not correct: for an input like [5, 6, 7, 10], your code snippet computes the median to be (7+10)/2 while it should be (6+7)/2. –  Hbf May 19 '13 at 16:15
    
@Hbf you were right, I saw the issue with the calculation with an even array and fixed it. Changing middle+1 to middle-1 in the "even" logic should fix the logic properly. –  Walls May 20 '13 at 13:13
1  
errmmm... when using this in Java for Android, your even calculation is still not quite correct. For example: numArray is 1,2,3,4,7,7 and your code would return "3.0", whereas it should be "3.5". To address this, add "d" after the "2" so that your line reads: median = (medianA + medianB) / 2d; This ensures the values is not floored to 3.0 BTW, this would also be fine: median = ((double)(medianA + medianB) / 2); –  user1207504 Jul 25 '13 at 8:58
    
missing the case where length == 1 too –  Gracchus Mar 17 at 19:21
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Why don't you try the sort() function?

Documentation

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Why use Math.round(), as numArray.length / 2 gives an integer result anyways? However, as @mjgpy3 points out, this gives incorrect results for arrays with an even number of elements. –  Clockwork-Muse Aug 14 '12 at 15:44
    
Yes indeed. It wasn't actually my intention to publish that yet. Sorry for the confusion! @lynnyi hit the nail on the head –  ChrisHarris2012 Aug 14 '12 at 15:56
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Try sorting the array first. Then after it's sorted, if the array has an even amount of elements the mean of the middle two is the median, if it has a odd number, the middle element is the median.

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Use Arrays.sort and then take the middle element (in case the number n of elements in the array is odd) or take the average of the two middle elements (in case n is even).

  public static long median(long[] l)
  {
    Arrays.sort(l);
    int middle = l.length / 2;
    if (l.length % 2 == 0)
    {
      long left = l[middle - 1];
      long right = l[middle];
      return (left + right) / 2;
    }
    else
    {
      return l[middle];
    }
  }

Here are some examples:

  @Test
  public void evenTest()
  {
    long[] l = {
        5, 6, 1, 3, 2
    };
    Assert.assertEquals((3 + 4) / 2, median(l));
  }

  @Test
  public oddTest()
  {
    long[] l = {
        5, 1, 3, 2, 4
    };
    Assert.assertEquals(3, median(l));
  }

And in case your input is a Collection, you might use Google Guava to do something like this:

public static long median(Collection<Long> numbers)
{
  return median(Longs.toArray(numbers)); // requires import com.google.common.primitives.Longs;
}
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Check out the Arrays.sort methods:

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/util/Arrays.html

You should also really abstract finding the median into its own method, and just return the value to the calling method. This will make testing your code much easier.

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If you want to use any external library here is Apache commons math library using you can calculate the Median.
For more methods and use take look at the API documentation

import org.apache.commons.math3.*;
.....
......
........
//calculate median
public double getMedian(double[] values){
 Median median = new Median();
 double medianValue = median.evaluate(values);
 return medianValue;
}
.......

Update

Calculate in program

Generally, median is calculated using the following two formulas given here

If n is odd then Median (M) = value of ((n + 1)/2)th item term.
If n is even then Median (M) = value of [((n)/2)th item term + ((n)/2 + 1)th item term ]/2

In your program you have numArray, first you need to sort array using Arrays#sort

Arrays.sort(numArray);
int middle = numArray.length/2;
int medianValue = 0; //declare variable 
if (numArray.length%2 == 1) 
    medianValue = numArray[middle];
else
   medianValue = (numArray[middle-1] + numArray[middle]) / 2;
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@Aniket has the most correct answer, but I would change a line.

median = numArray[middle-1] + Math.abs(numArray[middle-1] - numArray[middle] )/2;

for two middle add up to more than int max cases

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