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I am currently trying to set a debug flag using command-line arguments in Perl and I seem to be having problems with something which I thought was pretty easy.

    my $debugvalue;

    my $file = $ARGV[0] or die;

    if ($ARGV[1] == "debug")
    {
        $debugvalue = 1;
    }else
    {
        $debugvalue = 0;
    }

I am looking to enter a file followed by a word purely saying debug, if it doesn't then set the flag to 0.

test.pl file.txt debug
  • Would set the flag to 1

    test.pl file.txt debug

  • Would set the flag to 0

I would assume this how you do this, except whatever is inputted, it always drops into the first part of the if and sets the flag to 1.

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1  
Well, 0 == 0. –  cjm Aug 14 '12 at 17:17
1  
This is a problem that warnings would have caught. –  brian d foy Aug 14 '12 at 18:41
    
$ARGV[1] eq "debug" –  Brad Gilbert Oct 12 '12 at 22:14
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4 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

That would work fine, but you need to use the string comparison, eq, rather than numeric comparison, ==.

if ($ARGV[1] eq "debug")

Also, you can shorten that up to just:

my $debugvalue = $ARGV[1] eq "debug";

In general, I prefer to use the environment for debug settings, though.

my $debugvalue = $ENV{DEBUG} || 0;

Then you can do things like:

DEBUG=1 test.pl file.txt

or set the test on for every run in bash or zsh:

export DEBUG=1
test.pl file.txt
test.pl file2.txt
test.pl file3.txt

or even have more than one debug level if you need aggressive debugging output to help diagnose a particular problem:

DEBUG=3 test.pl file.txt

and in your code:

warn "Fiddly Detail $x\n" if $debugvalue > 2;
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You should do string comparisons with eq not ==.

if ($ARGV[1] eq "debug")
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I almost always use Getopt or Getopt::Long. Both in CPAN, super simple to use and very standardized. For example:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use Getopt::Long;

my $debug = 0;

my $result = GetOptions(
    debug => \$debug
);

my $file = shift;

if ( $debug ) {
    print( "debug is on for processing $file..." );
}

Of course, because it uses standard syntax, you would call it thusly:

#> test.pl file.txt --debug

or

#> test.pl --debug file.txt

---- EDIT ----

@zostay brings up a good point, debugging at various levels can be very useful. That can be added in to the Getopot::Long approach thusly:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use Getopt::Long;

my $debug = 0;

my $result = GetOptions(
    "debug+" => \$debug
);

my $file = shift;

if ( $debug > 2 ) {
    print( "debug is at least level 2 for processing $file..." );
}

And, for level 2 debugging, would be called:

#> test.pl --debug --debug file.txt

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As folks have already pointed out that "eq" should be used for string comparisons and other ways of supporting a debug feature, the only other suggestions I'd add is that using perl's -w (warning) flag during development is also helpful for finding issues like yours:

#!/usr/bin/perl -w

In your initial example, it would've returned a warning like:

Argument "debug" isn't numeric in numeric eq (==) at ./foo.pl line 7.

It might also be cleaner to check for the existence of $ARGV[1] before using it in a comparison:

if ($ARGV[1] && $ARGV[1] eq "debug")
{
    $debugvalue = 1;
...
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3  
I would suggest use warnings rather than -w. For one thing, -w turns on warnings for code that you didn't write, which is rarely helpful. For another, use warnings isn't ephemeral like -w is (and there's no real reason to take it out of the code when you're done debugging). –  hobbs Aug 14 '12 at 17:30
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