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I'm modifying polymorphism example from here to test multiple inheritance. When I run the following code, I get a strange value "15794192" printed on console where I expect 20 as a result. What is wrong? I appreciate your opinion.

I've tried to workaround the errors that are caused by problems in multiple inheritance, and come up with this code that doesn't make any build error. The issue I'm discussing may not be rooted in multiple inheritance but I'm not yet sure. The original example in the web page cited works fine needless to say.

(Environment) Ubuntu 12.04, cmake 2.8.7 run on eclipse Indigo

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class CPolygon //: public CShape
{
protected:
  int width, height;
public:
  void set_values(int a, int b)
  {
    width = a;
    height = b;
  }
  virtual int area(void) =0;
  void printarea(void)
  {
    cout << this->area() << endl;
  }
};

class CustomPolygon : public CPolygon
{
public:
  int customParam;
  void printarea(void)
  {
    this->CPolygon::printarea();
  }
};

class Rectangle : public CPolygon // This class should be concrete.
{
public:
  int area(void)
  {
    return (width * height);
  }
  void printarea(void)
  {
    this->CPolygon::printarea();
  }
};

class CustomSquare : public CustomPolygon, Rectangle  // Concrete class
{
public:
  int area()
  {
    this->Rectangle::area();
  }
  void printarea(void)
  {
    this->Rectangle::printarea();
  }
  void set_values(int a, int b)
  {
    this->Rectangle::set_values(a, b);
  }
};

int main()
{
  CustomSquare *cs = new CustomSquare();
  cs->CustomSquare::set_values(4, 5);
  cs->CustomSquare::printarea();
  return 0;
}

(Update 8/14/12) Thanks to advices, now I'm able to avoid explicitly declaring the functions from which super class to be used by using virtual inheritance. Updated code is here:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class CPolygon
{
protected:
  int width, height;
public:
  void set_values(int a, int b)
  {
    width = a;
    height = b;
  }
  virtual int area(void) =0;
  void printarea(void)
  {
    cout << this->area() << endl;
  }
};

class CustomPolygon : virtual public CPolygon
{
public:
  int customParam;
};

class Rectangle : virtual public CPolygon
{
public:
  int area(void)
  {
    return (width * height);
  }
};

class CustomSquare : public CustomPolygon, Rectangle
{
};

int main()
{
  CustomSquare *cs = new CustomSquare();
  cs->CustomSquare::set_values(4, 5);
  cs->CustomSquare::printarea();
  return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
I am not sure that the example will be very enlightening... I am quite familiar with C++ and inheritance and it is not simple to follow and understand what the expected behavior should be. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Aug 14 '12 at 17:06
    
@David Rodríguez - dribeas I understand what you're saying but not sure how NOT enlightening this example is...Do you have any idea? –  IsaacS Aug 15 '12 at 3:18
1  
Well, my point is that the example is convoluted mixing the basics of OO (virtual function dispatch) with explicit calls. The main problem is that instead of working with a simple type hierarchy, you are using multiple inheritance and hitting the diamond problem (the same base type is a base through different paths in the hierarchy, creating multiple subobjects of the same type. This type of hierarchies is not common in real world scenarios, and when they happen, they are usually handled with virtual inheritance (so that there is a single base (CPolygon) object in your hierarchy. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Aug 15 '12 at 3:24
    
... that is, semantically CustomSquare does not contain two different CPolygon, rather a single one although through different bases. Now, if the hierarchy did not contain the diamond or if inheritance was virtual, then CustomSquare would not need to implement area manually dispatching to the Rectangle implementation, as the overrider in Rectangle would already be the final overrider. The example is unrealistic, and you might have come to the conclusion that you needed to provide area in CustomSquare (as the compiler requires you to), but that is not an issue of ... –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Aug 15 '12 at 3:27
    
.. inheritance, but rather of the strange design that you used. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Aug 15 '12 at 3:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

In the function area in CustomSquare, you don't return any value!

I''m not familiar with Eclipse, but I'm pretty sure there is a way to enable warnings for situations like that.
In g++ it would be the -Wreturn-type switch, or -Wall

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, now it works. My bad... (I'll accept this as answer after system allows to do so). –  IsaacS Aug 14 '12 at 17:01

You need to return something from the CustomSquare::area() method:

int area()
{
  return this->Rectangle::area();
}

You should also consider using virtual inheritance, since you have a case of diamond inheritance:

class CustomPolygon : virtual public CPolygon {};

class Rectangle : virtual public CPolygon {};
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but adding virtual at those 2 class declaration yields another wrong value (39272464) ...And, forgot to mention but I want Rectangle to be concrete class. –  IsaacS Aug 14 '12 at 16:57
    
@IsaacS Sorry, that was not the cause of the error. It is the missing return issue. –  juanchopanza Aug 14 '12 at 16:58
    
I see. Now it works with return value :) –  IsaacS Aug 14 '12 at 16:59

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