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I have an array of valid e-mail address domains. Given an e-mail address, I want to see if its domain is valid

string[] validDomains = { "@test1.com", "@test2.com", "@test3.com" };
string email = "test@test1.com"

Is there a way to check if email contains any of the values of validDomains without using a loop?

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8 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

I would like to recommend you the following code:

HashSet<string> validDomains = new HashSet<string>
    {
        "test1.com", "test2.com", "test3.com"
    };
const string email = "test@test1.com";

MailAddress mailAddress = new MailAddress(email);
if (validDomains.Contains(mailAddress.Host))
{
    // Contains!
}

HashSet.Contains Method is an O(1) operation; while array - O(n). So HashSet<T>.Contains is extremely fast. Also, HashSet does not store the duplicate values and there is no point to store them in your case.

MailAddress Class represents the address of an electronic mail sender or recipient. It contains mail address parsing logic (just not to reinvent the wheel).

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2  
Why down vote? What's wrong? –  Sergey Brunov Aug 14 '12 at 18:20
    
This is perfect, thanks –  Steven Aug 14 '12 at 18:37
1  
Fast, functional and elegant. I shamed myself below =) –  Jonathan Prates Aug 14 '12 at 18:41
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If you want to be efficient, not only should you avoid using a loop, but you should construct a HashSet for your allowed domains, which would allow O(1) lookup:

string[] validDomains = { "@test1.com", "@test2.com", "@test3.com" };
HashSet<string> validDomainsHashSet = new HashSet<string>(validDomains);

string email = "test@test1.com";
string domain = email.Substring(email.IndexOf('@'));
bool isValidDomain = validDomainsHashSet.Contains(domain);

It would also make sense to exclude the @ character from your domains, since it would be present in all and thereby redundant:

string[] validDomains = { "test1.com", "test2.com", "test3.com" };
HashSet<string> validDomainsHashSet = new HashSet<string>(validDomains);

string email = "test@test1.com";
string domain = email.Substring(email.IndexOf('@') + 1);
bool isValidDomain = validDomainsHashSet.Contains(domain);
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And why would you assume that this is what he wants? This is premature optimization. –  Vitaliy Aug 14 '12 at 18:18
4  
Are you serious? Reducing computational lookup from O(n) to O(1) is premature optimization? Do you even know what that term means? –  Douglas Aug 14 '12 at 18:20
1  
@Vitaliy He isn't "assuming that this is what he wants", he is giving the OP a better, more efficient way of getting "what he wants" while simultaneously answering the question. –  NominSim Aug 14 '12 at 18:21
    
Better? Why? because it has better asymptotic performance? Code should be first of all as concise as possible. Than it should be performant (this is slightly oversimplified for brevity). –  Vitaliy Aug 14 '12 at 18:27
1  
@Vitaliy It doesn't seem less concise to put valid domains in a hash set instead of a string array, especially considering that duplicate domains are superfluous. Additionally there are the aforementioned computational gains. That is what makes this better, while still answering the OPs question. I don't agree with your statement about always writing concise code over "performant" code either but I won't get into that here. –  NominSim Aug 14 '12 at 18:37
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The simplest way with LINQ (this also ignores the case):

bool validEmail = validDomains
   .Any(d => email.EndsWith(d, StringComparer.OrdinalIgnoreCase));
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why the down vote? –  Daniel A. White Aug 14 '12 at 18:19
    
+1 To compensate –  NominSim Aug 14 '12 at 18:24
    
@DanielA.White: I didn't downvote on this one; the answer is valid. –  Douglas Aug 14 '12 at 18:29
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int index = email.IndexOf("@");
var domain = email.Substring(index)
return validDomains.Any(x=>x == domain);
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Check this out:

        string[] validDomains = { "@test1.com", "@test2.com", "@test3.com" };
        string email = "test@test1.com";
        if (validDomains.Contains(email.Substring(email.IndexOf("@"))))
        {

        }
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With a for each loop in this way :

    string[] validDomains = { "@test1.com", "@test2.com", "@test3.com" };
    string email = "test@test1.com";
foreach (string x in validDomains)
{
    if (email.Contains(x))
    {
        //  Do Something
    }
}

Without a loop in this way(with LINQ) :

if(validDomains.Any(s => email.Contains(s))) {
//Do Something 
}
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the op doesnt want a loop. –  Daniel A. White Aug 14 '12 at 18:18
    
Contains might not be the right answer. –  Daniel A. White Aug 14 '12 at 18:24
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I think that the simple way is using linq and FirstOrDefault()

        string[] validDomains = { "@test5.com", "@test2.com", "@test3.com" };
        string email = "test@test1.com";

        var found = ((from domain in validDomains
                      where email.Contains(domain)
                      select domain).FirstOrDefault() != null);
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validDomains.Any(validDomain => email.EndsWith(validDomain))

Refer to the documentation of IEnumerable.Any for more details.

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@Douglas - they didnt specify that. –  Daniel A. White Aug 14 '12 at 18:27
    
@Douglas, now you are just being mean. –  Vitaliy Aug 14 '12 at 18:28
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