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I'd like to be able to subtract two hashes and get a third hash in Ruby.

The two hashes look like this:

h1 = {"Cat" => 100, "Dog" => 5, "Bird" => 2, "Snake" => 10}
h1.default = 0

h2 = {"cat" => 50, "dog" => 3, "BIRD" => 4, "Mouse" => 75, "Snake" => 10}
h2.default = 0

I'd like to be able to call a method on h1 like this:

h1.difference(h2)

and get this hash as a result:

{"Cat" => 50, "Dog" => 2, "BIRD" => -2, "Mouse" => -75}

I'd like to create a new hash with keys from both Hashes and the values of the new hash to be the value of the key in the first hash minus the value of that key in the second hash. The catch is that I'd like this Hash method to work regardless of the case of the keys. In other words, I'd like "Cat" to match up with "cat".

Here's what I have so far:

class Hash
  def difference(another_hash)
    (keys + another_hash.keys).map { |key| key.strip }.uniq.inject(Hash.new(0)) { |acc, key| acc[key] = (self[key] - another_hash[key]); acc }.delete_if { |key, value| value == 0 }
  end
end

This is OK, but, unfortunately, the result isn't what I want.

Any help would be appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
in example the key name are not in same case example Dog in first and dog is second is it by mistake or as expected? –  PriteshJ Aug 14 '12 at 18:29
    
This is as expected. I have hashes where the case may be all lower case in one hash and mixed case in another. I'd like to be able to match, for example, "Dog" with "dog", or "Dog" with "DOG", etc. –  user1561696 Aug 14 '12 at 18:31
2  
what happens if h1={"cat" => 1, "Cat" => 2} h2={"cAt" => 3}? –  tokland Aug 14 '12 at 18:34
    
pre-processing the keys so they are normalized is out of the question? –  tokland Aug 14 '12 at 18:49
    
I haven't had cases like this, so I didn't think of that one. It's a good question. I think one way would be to have nothing for "cat" (or "Cat" or "cAt") in the resulting hash since the values of "cat" and "Cat" in h1 equal the value of "cAt" in h2. –  user1561696 Aug 14 '12 at 18:50

5 Answers 5

How about converting the hashes to sets.

require 'set'

h1 = {"Cat" => 100, "Dog" => 5, "Bird" => 2, "Snake" => 10}
h1.default = 0

h2 = {"cat" => 50, "dog" => 3, "BIRD" => 4, "Mouse" => 75, "Snake" => 10}
h2.default = 0

p (h1.to_set - h2.to_set)
#=> #<Set: {["Cat", 100], ["Dog", 5], ["Bird", 2]}>
share|improve this answer
    
I don't like how the result of the subtraction differs from what you would expect. I expect a hash but am getting a set back. Otherwise, this is much more concise than the other answers. –  Martin Cortez Dec 5 '13 at 16:33
    
This doesn't subtract the values of the keys, which is what OP requested. For instance, in the desired result, "Dog" => 2. –  Kyle Strand May 27 at 18:58

As a recommendation...

I've used something like this in the past:

class Hash
  def downcase_keys
    Hash[map{ |k,v| [k.downcase, v]}]
  end

  def difference(other)
    Hash[self.to_a - other.to_a]
  end
  alias :- :difference
end

which lets me do things like:

irb(main):206:0> h1.downcase_keys - h2.downcase_keys
{
     "cat" => 100,
     "dog" => 5,
    "bird" => 2
}
irb(main):207:0> h2.downcase_keys - h1.downcase_keys
{
      "cat" => 50,
      "dog" => 3,
     "bird" => 4,
    "mouse" => 75
}

The alias gives you the nice syntax of using - instead of difference, similar to using - for Arrays and Sets. You can still use difference though:

irb(main):210:0> h1.downcase_keys.difference(h2.downcase_keys)
{
     "cat" => 100,
     "dog" => 5,
    "bird" => 2
}
irb(main):211:0> h2.downcase_keys.difference(h1.downcase_keys)
{
      "cat" => 50,
      "dog" => 3,
     "bird" => 4,
    "mouse" => 75
}

I always normalize my hash keys, and don't allow variants to leak in. It makes processing the hashes much too difficult when you don't know what the keys are called, so I'd highly recommend doing that as a first step. It's a code-maintenance issue.

Otherwise, you could create a map of the original key names and their normalized names, but you run into problems if your hash contains two unique-case keys, such as 'key' and 'KEY', because normalizing will stomp on one.

share|improve this answer
    
Have you redefined array subtraction? The built-in method behaves like set-subtraction. –  Kyle Strand Jul 3 at 15:41

Sorry that due to the time limit (I have to take care of my baby boy now), only figured out this stupid but working code:

h1 = {"Cat" => 100, "Dog" => 5, "Bird" => 2, "Snake" => 10}
h1.default = 0
h2 = {"cat" => 50, "dog" => 3, "BIRD" => 4, "Mouse" => 75, "Snake" => 10}
h2.default = 0
h3 = {"Cat" => 50, "Dog" => 2, "BIRD" => -2, "Mouse" => -75}

class Hash
  def difference(subtrahend)
    diff = {}
    self.each_pair do |k1, v1|
      flag = false
      subtrahend.each_pair do |k2, v2|
        if k1.downcase == k2.downcase
          flag = true
          v_diff = v1 - v2
          break if v_diff == 0
          v_diff > 0 ? diff[k1] = v_diff : diff[k2] = v_diff
        end
      end
      diff[k1] = v1 unless flag
    end
    subtrahend.each_pair do |k2, v2|
      flag = false
      self.each_pair do |k1, v1|
        if k1.downcase == k2.downcase
          flag = true
          break
        end
      end
      diff[k2] = -v2 unless flag
    end
    return diff
  end
end

h1.difference(h2) == h3 ? puts("Pass") : puts("Fail") #=> "Pass"
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, everyone for your excellent suggestions. –  user1561696 Aug 16 '12 at 18:47
    
You're welcome. I think you can accept one as best answer which meets your requirement. BTW, I've just posted another better answer. –  Jing Li Aug 17 '12 at 11:54

I got this to the resque https://github.com/junegunn/insensitive_hash

then follow your procedure but slighly tweaked as requirement

require 'insensitive_hash'

h1 = {"Cat" => 100, "Dog" => 5, "Bird" => 2, "Snake" => 10}.insensitive
h1.default = 0

h2 = {"cat" => 50, "dog" => 3, "BIRD" => 4, "Mouse" => 75, "Snake" => 10}.insensitive
h2.default = 0


class Hash
  def difference(another_hash)
    (keys + another_hash.keys).map { |key|
      key.downcase }.uniq.inject(Hash.new(0)) do |acc, key|
      val = self[key] - another_hash[key]
      acc[key] = val if val!= 0
      acc
    end
  end
end

h1.difference(h2)
# => {"cat"=>50, "dog"=>2, "bird"=>-2, "mouse"=>-75} 
share|improve this answer

This time I would like to provide another solution: normalized -> store original key value pairs -> grab the original key who has larger value as the key for the difference.

h1 = {"Cat" => 100, "Dog" => 5, "Bird" => 2, "Snake" => 10}
h1.default = 0
h2 = {"cat" => 50, "dog" => 3, "BIRD" => 4, "Mouse" => 75, "Snake" => 10}
h2.default = 0
h3 = {"Cat" => 50, "Dog" => 2, "BIRD" => -2, "Mouse" => -75}


class Hash
  def difference(subtrahend)
    # create a hash which contains all normalized keys
    all_pairs = (self.keys.map{|x| x.downcase} + subtrahend.keys.map{|x| x.downcase}).uniq.inject({}) do |pairs, key|
      pairs[key] = []
      pairs
    end
    #=> {"mouse"=>[], "cat"=>[], "snake"=>[], "bird"=>[], "dog"=>[]}

    # push original key value pairs into array which is the value of just created hash
    [self, subtrahend].each_with_index do |hsh, idx|
      hsh.each_pair { |k, v| all_pairs[k.downcase].push([k, v]) }
      all_pairs.each_value { |v| v.push([nil, 0]) if v.size == idx }
    end
    #=> {"mouse"=>[[nil, 0], ["Mouse", 75]], "cat"=>[["Cat", 100], ["cat", 50]], "snake"=>[["Snake", 10], ["Snake", 10]], "bird"=>[["Bird", 2], ["BIRD", 4]], "dog"=>[["Dog", 5], ["dog", 3]]}

    results = {}
    all_pairs.each_value do |values|
      diff = values[0][1] - values[1][1]
      # always take the key whose value is larger
      if diff > 0
        results[values[0][0]] = diff
      elsif diff < 0
        results[values[1][0]] = diff
      end
    end
    return results
  end
end

puts h1.difference(h2).inspect #=> {"Cat" => 50, "Dog" => 2, "BIRD" => -2, "Mouse" => -75}
h1.difference(h2) == h3 ? puts("Pass") : puts("Fail") #=> "Pass"

According to what you described, this one does a pretty good job. The result is exactly what you've shown (key is not normalized in the final result, but depends on whose value is bigger).

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