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I have this query that works great. I have a N:N relationship with my Freetrials and Contacts, and a N:1 relationship with Freetrials and Companies. A Freetrial can have multiple contacts, and contacts could potentially sign up for multiple Freetrials. A Freetrial can only have 1 company, and companies could potentially sign up for multiple Freetrials.

SELECT `freetrial`.*,`company`.name as name, `contact`.first_name,`contact`.last_name FROM `contact_freetrial`
    INNER JOIN `freetrial` ON `contact_freetrial`.freetrial_id=`freetrial`.id
    INNER JOIN `contact` ON `contact_freetrial`.contact_id=`contact`.id
    LEFT JOIN `company` ON `company`.id=`freetrial`.company_id

This works great, until I have 2 contacts:

Id  Company    Contact          Date     
110 MCC        P Sh***      08/14/2012
110 MCC        W Bu***      08/14/2012
111 Foo        x yy***      08/14/2012
112 BAR        y zz***      08/14/2012

I want to only display a SINGLE company/freetrial if there are multiple contacts. So I basically just want it to look like this:

Id  Company    Contact          Date     
110 MCC        P Sh***      08/14/2012
111 Foo        x yy***      08/14/2012
112 BAR        y zz***      08/14/2012

Any help in getting it to do this would be greatly appreciated.

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do you really want to select one contact from the contact table? And which one do you want to select? –  codingbiz Aug 14 '12 at 18:53
1  
Can you just GROUP BY the Company? –  ficuscr Aug 14 '12 at 18:56

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The idea is that you want to get a random contact. Then join in the contact information:

select t.*, c.first_name, c.last_name
from (SELECT `freetrial`.*,`company`.name as name,
             (select ContactId
              from Contact where contact.company_id = company.id
              order by rand()
              limit 1
             ) as thecontactid
      FROM  `contact_freetrial` INNER JOIN
             freetrial`
             ON `contact_freetrial`.freetrial_id=`freetrial`.id LEFT JOIN
            `company` ON `company`.id=`freetrial`.company_id
    ) t join
    contact c
    on t.thecontactid = c.contactid

This selects a random contact using a correlated subquery. It then joins in the information.

The problem with using the "group by" method is that mysql does not guarantee that the different fields come from the same record. You might get the irst name from one record and the last name from another. So, even if it seems to work, it is not guaranteed to work. (And this is besides the fact that it uses a syntax for group by that is non-standard.)

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I've never seen MySQL's GROUP BY use different column-values from the same table before - do you have a reference for that? Also, what do you mean regarding "uses a syntax for group by that is non-standard"? What's not standard about it? –  newfurniturey Aug 14 '12 at 19:52
    
@newfurniturey . . . What is non-standard is having columns in the select with no aggregation function. Mysql is not shy about this. It is clearly documented as "hidden columns" here dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.5/en/group-by-hidden-columns.html. –  Gordon Linoff Aug 14 '12 at 20:06
    
That's actually a great explanation regarding the standard-syntax issue - good call! Still not worth a "it's a problem" statement, in my opinion, but a good call nonetheless. –  newfurniturey Aug 14 '12 at 20:09
    
@newfurniturey . . . I realize (and even respect) the fact that mysql acolytes will defend this "feature". For those who use other databases, it really does come across as a misfeature, that results in poorly understood SQL statements. A better implementation IMHO would have been to use the "ANY" function rather than hidden columns. –  Gordon Linoff Aug 14 '12 at 20:17

You can use GROUP BY, such as GROUP BY freetrial.id, company.name to have all results grouped by the freetrial/company combination - thereby returning only a single-row per freetrial/company:

SELECT
    `freetrial`.*,`company`.name as name, `contact`.first_name,`contact`.last_name
FROM
    `contact_freetrial`
    INNER JOIN `freetrial` ON `contact_freetrial`.freetrial_id=`freetrial`.id
    INNER JOIN `contact` ON `contact_freetrial`.contact_id=`contact`.id
    LEFT JOIN `company` ON `company`.id=`freetrial`.company_id
GROUP BY
    freetrial.id, company.name

As an additional bonus, you could use GROUP_CONCAT() to get a list of every contact for the given freetrial/company - all in the same row:

SELECT
    `freetrial`.*,`company`.name as name,
    GROUP_CONCAT(CONCAT(contact.first_name, ' ', contact.last_name)) AS contacts
FROM
    `contact_freetrial`
    INNER JOIN `freetrial` ON `contact_freetrial`.freetrial_id=`freetrial`.id
    INNER JOIN `contact` ON `contact_freetrial`.contact_id=`contact`.id
    LEFT JOIN `company` ON `company`.id=`freetrial`.company_id
GROUP BY
    freetrial.id, company.name

In this example, I also used CONCAT() to combine the contact's first and last names. The list that it will return will be a comma-separated list of each contact - if there are multiple - for each freetrial/company combination.

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This will give you the row by latest contact.

SELECT `freetrial`.*,`company`.name as name, `contact`.first_name,
                   `contact`.last_name FROM `contact_freetrial` A
    INNER JOIN `freetrial` ON `contact_freetrial`.freetrial_id=`freetrial`.id
    INNER JOIN `contact` ON `A`.contact_id=`contact`.id
    LEFT JOIN `company` ON `company`.id=`freetrial`.company_id
where A.id = (select max(id) from contact_freetrial where contact_id = A.id)
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