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How do you start a thread with parameters in C#?

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The answer to this question varies widely across versions of the runtime - is a 3.5 answer fine? –  quillbreaker Jul 28 '09 at 18:39
4  
"varies widely" ??? how so? –  huseyint Jul 28 '09 at 18:40
2  
Wow. I've been editing some of your old questions, but it could be a full-time job. I had forgotten, uh, how much you've improved over the years. :-) –  John Saunders Dec 26 '13 at 19:56

12 Answers 12

up vote 73 down vote accepted

Yep :

Thread t = new Thread (new ParameterizedThreadStart(myParamObject));
t.Start (myUrl);
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9  
is this the same: ThreadStart processTaskThread = delegate { ProcessTasks(databox.DataboxID ); }; new Thread(processTaskThread).Start(); –  JL. Jul 28 '09 at 18:35
1  
The databox.DataboxID will be encapsulated in the delegate you create (this is called a "closure"), so this is also a way to do it. –  Thomas Jul 28 '09 at 18:37
    
Use ParameterizedThreadStart to be able to pass parameters to that delegate when you call Start method. You are using a ThreadStart delegate which does not expect a method with a parameter in its signature, that is wrong in your case. –  huseyint Jul 28 '09 at 18:48
36  
What is myParamObject and myUrl? –  dialex Mar 14 '12 at 17:26
    
In this case void MyParamObject(object myUrl){ //do stuff } should have parameter type object –  Jimmer Oct 24 '14 at 3:21

One of the 2 overloads of the Thread constructor takse a ParameterizedThreadStart delegate which allows you to pass a single parameter to the start method. Unfortunately though it only allows for a single parameter and it does so in an unsafe way because it passes it as object. I find it's much easier to use a lambda expression to capture the relevant parameters and pass them in a strongly typed fashion.

Try the following

public Thread StartTheThread(SomeType param1, SomeOtherType param2) {
  var t = new Thread(() => RealStart(param1, param2));
  t.Start();
  return t;
}

private static void RealStart(SomeType param1, SomeOtherType param2) {
  ...
}
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25  
+1: Even though the currently selected answer is absolutely correct, this one by JaredPar is the better one. It simply is the best solution for most practical cases. –  galaktor Oct 10 '09 at 10:27
    
This solution is much better then the standrard ParameterizedThreadStart –  Piotr Owsiak Jul 30 '10 at 13:33
3  
Nice so simple. Just wrap any call in "new Thread(() => FooBar() ).Start(); –  Thomas Jespersen Nov 29 '10 at 15:02
10  
Awesome, this is for VB.NET guys Dim thr As New Thread(Sub() DoStuff(settings)) –  dr. evil Sep 17 '11 at 22:55
1  
@bavaza I was just referring to the static type checking –  JaredPar Jan 9 '14 at 13:53
class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Thread t = new Thread(new ParameterizedThreadStart(ThreadMethod));

        t.Start("My Parameter");
    }

    static void ThreadMethod(object parameter)
    {
        // parameter equals to "My Parameter"
    }
}
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1  
This is giving me "No overload for 'DoWork' matches delegate 'System.Threading.ParameterizedThreadStart' –  advocate Jan 9 '13 at 21:41
    
What would be the difference if you just passed ThreadMethod in the Thread t initialization? –  Joe Feb 20 '14 at 22:19

Use ParameterizedThreadStart.

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6  
This is scary :) –  Thomas Jul 28 '09 at 18:36

Use ParametrizedThreadStart.

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2  
haha...good answer. –  Justin Niessner Jul 28 '09 at 18:37

You could use a ParametrizedThreadStart delegate:

string parameter = "Hello world!";
Thread t = new Thread(new ParameterizedThreadStart(MyMethod));
t.Start(parameter);
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The ParameterizedThreadStart takes one parameter. You can use that to send one parameter, or a custom class containing several properties.

Another method is to put the method that you want to start as an instance member in a class along with properties for the parameters that you want to set. Create an instance of the class, set the properties and start the thread specifying the instance and the method, and the method can access the properties.

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Thread thread = new Thread(Work);
thread.Start(Parameter);

private void Work(object param)
{
    string Parameter = (string)param;
}

The parameter type must be an object.

EDIT:

While this answer isn't incorrect I do recommend against this approach. Using a lambda expression is much easier to read and doesn't require type casting. See here: http://stackoverflow.com/a/1195915/52551

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4  
I found this clearer than the accepted answer. –  Kaganar May 29 '12 at 14:36
    
"The parameter type must be an object." - thank! –  Alexandr Jun 18 '13 at 13:09

You can use the BackgroundWorker RunWorkerAsync method and pass in your value.

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You can use lambda expressions

private void MyMethod(string param1,int param2)
{
  //do stuff
}
Thread myNewThread = new Thread(() => MyMethod("param1",5));
myNewThread.Start();

this is so far the best answer i could find, it's fast and easy.

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Best solution for simple cases IMO –  Dunc Apr 12 '13 at 13:12
    
what is that =>? and where can i find more information about the syntax? –  Nick Aug 13 '13 at 8:56
    
This is a lambda expression, some info can be found on these addresses: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/vstudio/bb397687.aspx | codeproject.com/Articles/24255/Exploring-Lambda-Expression-in-C | dotnetperls.com/lambda –  Georgi-it Aug 13 '13 at 12:31
    
This worked for me. I tried the ParameterizedThreadStart and variations of it but had no joy. I was using .NET Framework 4 in a supposedly simple console application. –  Daniel Hollinrake Mar 17 '14 at 12:18
    
I like this method. It works perfectly for my case. –  Hao Nguyen Jul 12 '14 at 23:00

I was having issue in the passed parameter. I passed integer from a for loop to the function and displayed it , but it always gave out different results. like (1,2,2,3) (1,2,3,3) (1,1,2,3) etc with ParametrizedThreadStart delegate.

this simple code worked as a charm

Thread thread = new Thread(Work);
thread.Start(Parameter);

private void Work(object param) 
{
 string Parameter = (string)param; 
}
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You could also delegate like this...

        ThreadStart ts = delegate
        {
              bool moreWork = DoWork("param1", "param2", "param3");
              if (moreWork) 
              {
                  DoMoreWork("param1", "param2");
              }
        };
        new Thread(ts).Start();
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