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I can see the usefulness of the new async and await keyword in GUI applications where adding a thread to do some calculation is necessary and the new keywords really make it easy. But what about other types of applications?

For example, a server that does some work or a process that constantly processes data? It may be me still misunderstanding the new keywords, but do these types of applications benefit from the new keywords or should we continue using Tasks for more explicit multi threading?

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Note that async does not create a background thread. In the async world, you can run background code on thread pool threads the same way you do today: Task.Run is just shorthand for Task.Factory.StartNew. You may find my intro helpful. –  Stephen Cleary Aug 15 '12 at 1:12
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await and async are complementary to tasks.

You should still use tasks, but using await and async with them simply makes the writing of asynchronous methods easier.

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For example, a server that does some work or a process that constantly processes data?

This is very appropriate here. For example, in WCF services, you can use async and await to compose multiple asynchronous service requests in a single async request without blocking.

It may be me still misunderstanding the new keywords, but do these types of applications benefit from the new keywords or should we continue using Tasks for more explicit multi threading?

The two work together, very well. Async and await often make working with and composing multiple operations which use Task and Task<T> far simpler.

However, at the "lowest level", your code that creates the actual Task will likely do so using the same TPL-based techniques. Once you have the method creating a Task, async and await making using that method (including using it to make more asynchronous methods, or using it to make methods which run multiple tasks concurrently) far simpler.

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Any time you plan to call a method that will end up being run asynchronously, without blocking, and for which you will have a callback method, you can use the new keywords to make that syntax easier. If you don't have any callback code and aren't following a continuation passing style of programming, then the new keywords probably aren't going to help you. (Which isn't to say that you can't use them if you really...really wanted to.)

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Even without a callback or continuation passing, they can still be benficial at times for exception handling. There is a lot of work done to simplify the exception model when you use async/await, which can dramatically simplify code even if you don't care about the callback involved. –  Reed Copsey Aug 14 '12 at 20:19
    
@ReedCopsey True, unless you consider handling an exception to be a type of callback (I kinda do, but I can see why someone might choose not to). –  Servy Aug 14 '12 at 20:23
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In non-GUI applications, the main advantage of using await is when you're doing I/O.

If you're doing it the “old way”, you're going to use synchronous methods for I/O, that block a thread while they're working. Using await, you're not blocking a thread, which mean syour application will be using fewer threads, which could lead to much lower memory usage (each thread needs 1 MB of memory) and overall better performance.

You could achieve similar improvements using the old Asynchronous Programming Model, but it's much more cumbersome.

If you don't care that your non-GUI application uses more threads than necessary, then there's not much use of await for you. But if you do care about that, await could help you a lot.

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For example, a server that does some work or a process that constantly processes data? It may be me still misunderstanding the new keywords, but do these types of applications benefit from the new keywords or should we continue using Tasks for more explicit multi threading?

I wrestled with this same question when I first started using TAP a few months back and concluded that TAP can work very well in a concurrent, "server-like" scenario, without having to "drop down" into some of the more nitty-gritty areas of the TPL, etc.

For example, the application I'm currently working on (which is a GUI app and, as an aside, also uses TAP to free up the GUI thread) needs to communicate repeatedly with a fairly large number of external machines using SSH. Imagine a large loop in which the app needs to a) send each external machine a "command" file, b) a short while later, poll all the external machines for "progress" files (ie use SSH to try to download a file), c) a short while later, poll all these machines for "completion" files, etc; and these steps are repeated over and over until we are "done".

In the first writing of this app, all this SSH i/o was done synchronously and the cumulative time to do each step was taking too long. Not to mention that it didn't scale well as we asked the app to support even more external machines.

I've since rewritten this application to do each of those steps (a, b, c as mentioned above) concurrently. So, for example, the sending of the command files to all external machines is happening more or less at the same time, instead of one after the other, allowing the app to move between these steps (a, b, c) quicker and with less degradation as we add more external machines.

I start each ssh operation via Task.Run() because the SSH library I'm using does not offer "async" abilities on its own (but the library is thread safe), and then I await all of them with 'await Task.WhenAll(task list)'. When done, I examine each task to see what the results were, and proceed accordingly.

In addition to just using TAP to make this all very comprehensible and pleasant to look at in the code, I'm also using its support for cancellation and progress objects to handle cancellation and report back to the user on the progress of these activities.

So far this is working wonderfully and I have not had to go any "deeper" than this into the TPL, etc. Some people have mentioned that when you get "heavily concurrent", you may have to drop down deeper into the TPL but I have not personally seen "why" yet..

So I would say, don't determine TAP's usefulness based on the "type" of application (gui, server, etc) but by the nature of the activity you need to perform in the app; if you need to have multiple calculations working concurrently, TAP can be great. If you have lots of i/o that needs to be done concurrently, TAP can be great. And we all know the canonical example of using TAP to free up the GUI thread.

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