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The only thing that passed to my mind was, MULT((3+2)(5*4))= 100 not 62? Can someone explain this?

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#define ADD(x1, y1) x1 + y1
#define MULT(x1,y1) x1 * y1


int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    int a,b,c,d,e,f,g;
    a=2;
    b=3;
    c=4;
    d=5;
    e= MULT(ADD(a,b),MULT(c,d));
    printf("the value of e is: %d\n", e);
    system("PAUSE");
}
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3  
Macros are text substitution. Substitute it yourself and work it out. –  chris Aug 14 '12 at 20:19
3  
Reason #54899 why macros are terrible in C++. This is why most macros have an absurd amount of parenthesis. –  tenfour Aug 14 '12 at 20:19
5  
This is why macros are normally liberally sprinkled with parentheses. –  harold Aug 14 '12 at 20:20
2  
@tenfour There's no C++ in there (except in the tags, which rarely means much). –  delnan Aug 14 '12 at 20:20
1  
Macros suck...see why? –  Captain Obvlious Aug 14 '12 at 20:21
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3 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted

When the macros are expanded, this:

MULT(ADD(a,b),MULT(c,d))

becomes:

a + b * c * d

which, replacing the variables with their values, is equivalent to:

2 + 3 * 4 * 5

and the value of this expression, evaluated according to the precedence rules, is 62, because multiplication has higher precedence than addition.

Don't use macros for this purpose: use functions.

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Thanks to lack of ()s, you end up with:

e = a + b * c * d;

because:

MULT(ADD(a,b),MULT(c,d)) -> MULT(a + b,c * d) -> a + b * c * d

So,

e = 2 + 3 * 4 * 5 = 2 + 60 = 62
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Avoid macros in C++

Your problem will be solved by doing this :

#define ADD(x1, y1) ((x1) + (y1))
#define MULT(x1,y1) ((x1) * (y1))

But don't do it.

Instead use functions (inline functions if necessary ).

int ADD(int x1, int y1) {
    return x1+y1;
}
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1  
Well... Actually not... The definitions should have even more paranthesis: #define MULT(x1, y1) ((x1) * ((y1))... Try MULT(2 + 3, 4 + 5)... –  Sani Huttunen Aug 14 '12 at 20:25
    
Not sure why you need (x1), but I may be missing something. (EDIT : you are right - I see the case where it will break). Anyways, for his stated usecase (x1+y1) is enough. Ideally he should be using functions. –  Chip Aug 14 '12 at 20:28
    
MULT(2 + 3, 4 + 5) => (2 + 3 * 4 + 5) => (2 + 12 + 5) = 19... Not the expected 45... –  Sani Huttunen Aug 14 '12 at 20:29
1  
Yes.. that should be a very common case.. changing my answer. –  Chip Aug 14 '12 at 20:29
1  
@Josh I may be missing something, but how about simply using a + b instead of an ADD(a, b) macro or an add(a, b) function? :) –  FredOverflow Aug 14 '12 at 21:25
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