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How to hide or encrypt javascript code?

I would like to make javascript+html5 app, but I don't feel like showing my "engine" to people. Is there any way to hide part of the code that is not needed for web browser to render page?

And I want to avoid php if it is possible...

Now that I think about it, wouldn't external .js with permissions set to "execute only" do the trick or it wouldn't load at all?

It's a shame that html5 can't use .dll's...

You can minify and obfusticate. Is there a specific reason you do not want to use a server side language or is it just php you are against?

I want to avoid server side languages, because I have cheap hosting. More users would kill my site.

It's a blessing html5 cannot use .dlls ;o)

If you want closed source website that's running mostly on client side... whatever...

Thanks for response, Tim and everyone else! I'll try to minify and obfusticate javascript, and do crucial parts in php.

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marked as duplicate by Michael Berkowski, scrappedcola, KingCrunch, Juhana, Donal Fellows Aug 15 '12 at 13:35

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You can minify and obfuscate the .js files, that's about it. You must send them to the browser to be executed –  Michael Berkowski Aug 14 '12 at 20:26
    
Javascript and HTML are client side languages. You'll need to use something server sided (PHP, .NET, ASPX) –  Steve Robbins Aug 14 '12 at 20:26
    
You can minify and obfusticate. Is there a specific reason you do not want to use a server side language or is it just php you are against? –  Jrod Aug 14 '12 at 20:27
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It's a blessing html5 cannot use .dlls ;o) –  Kai Mattern Aug 14 '12 at 20:32
    
Good luck...here's a good list of minify/obfuscate tools (I'm familiar with most of them and they will get the job done): stackoverflow.com/questions/3520285/… –  Tim Medora Aug 14 '12 at 20:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 13 down vote accepted

If it gets downloaded to the user agent (web browser) at any point, you can't truly hide it.

If you have a complex/proprietary process, run it on a server (in any language you choose, including JavaScript) and return only the results to the browser.

As noted in the comments, you can make interpreting the source more difficult by minifying/obfuscating the code.

Minification can make your scripts significantly smaller and combine multiple files into one, so it's definitely a good thing; just not a security mechanism. Minifying code usually (directly or indirectly) obfuscates the code, i.e. it is harder to read and interpret, but still fully accessible to a mildly determined observer.

For reference, this is a good list of minification tools: Is there a good JavaScript minimizer?

Now that I think about it, wouldn't external .js with permissions set to "execute only" do the trick or it wouldn't load at all?

That's a server-related permission. If code can be executed by the browser, a determined (or even casual) user can get the source.

I want to avoid server side languages, because I have cheap hosting. More users would kill my site.

See How to find web hosting that meets my requirements?

You can develop on your own machine using free tools and even the most basic hosting packages usually offer at least one server-side language.

It's a blessing html5 cannot use .dlls ;o)

If you want closed source website that's running mostly on client side... whatever...

That would be utter hell with native code...the DLLs would need to be compiled into machine code for every platform. Using intermediate code (like CIL) which would still require that every user had a runtime installed, it would be nearly as easy to reverse engineer as JavaScript.

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It's not that hard to reverse-engineer native code, so long as you're handy at reading disassembler output. –  Donal Fellows Aug 15 '12 at 13:37

You can theoretically give harder time to the user... see node.js

Node.js is a platform built on Chrome's JavaScript runtime for easily building fast, scalable network applications. Node.js uses an event-driven, non-blocking I/O model that makes it lightweight and efficient, perfect for data-intensive real-time applications that run across distributed devices.

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3  
... but Node really has nothing to do with the code that's sent to the browser for execution there. –  Pointy Aug 14 '12 at 20:29

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