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First of all I want to point out that I'm not very familiar with R, so sorry if one of the following questions is clear.

My motivation is to write a simple R-script, which should contain:

  1. import data
  2. do regression of form $ Y=aX+bZ+intercept$
  3. some calculations
  4. ouput

now here are my questions:

  1. This is a very general question: If I wrote the R script, then I have to load it with source(name.R), right? Must be there an additional command to execute the script?
  2. Suppose I did my regression with lm, like fit<-lm(Y~X+Z,data=database) this gives a nice ouput. What I really want is to save the coefficients of the model in a vector. How can I do this? Here would it be a 3-dimensional vector (intercept, a, b). EDIT I've tried coefficient<-coefficient(fit). This does not work! coefficient is not a numerical vector. There are also the name, i.e. intercept and the value below for the first element of it.
  3. If I want to print out the coefficients and some calculations at the very end of the script, how do I do this? Just write print(....)?

I'm very thankful for your help and Hopefully I considered all rules and conventions in this forum, since this is my first question. If not, I'm very sorry.

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your question is rather about R programming than about statistics. I think it would fit better to stackoverflow. –  cbeleites Apr 24 '12 at 17:19
    
when source (name.R) will look for the file name stored in variable name.R and try to source that file. If "name.R" is the actual file name, you need to use source ("name.R"). –  cbeleites Apr 24 '12 at 17:21

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If I wrote the R script, then I have to load it with source(name.R), right? Must be there an additional command to execute the script?

Not if your script directly invokes the commands

For instance if name.R contains

a <- 1:10
plot(a, a^2, t="l")

Then source("name.R") will directly generate a plot

However, if name.R contains

myfunction <- function()
   {
   a <- 1:10
   plot(a, a^2, t="l")
   }

Then sourcing it will only load the function. You will then have to invoke myfunction() to get the plot.

Suppose I did my regression with lm, like fit<-lm(Y~X+Z,data=database) this gives a nice ouput. What I really want is to save the coefficients of the model in a vector. How can I do this? Here would it be a 3-dimensional vector (intercept, a, b)
If I want to print out the coefficients and some calculations at the very end of the script, how do I do this? Just write print(....)?

 print(coef(fit))

will give you what you need (you can store them in an array with model.coef <- coef(fit))

Also, it can be interesting to run

 summary(fit)

See ?coef and ?summary for more info

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@ nico: Thanks for your answer! I will test it and accept it if everything works fine. Just one more question: Why do one use definitions like : model.coef? What does the "." stand for? –  math Apr 24 '12 at 17:04
    
@ nico: model.coef<-coef((fit)) does not work. I just want to the numerical values in this vector, not the name and vector. If I select the first element of model.coef, it returns the name: Intercept and below it's value! I really want a vector like (0.023,982,-32) –  math Apr 24 '12 at 17:07
    
@math: You can convert it to a numeric array with as.numeric(coef(fit)). Anyway those are just the column names, they shouldn't interfere with further manipulation (generally). –  nico Apr 24 '12 at 17:13
    
thanks! everything works now! –  math Apr 24 '12 at 17:15
    
@math: great! alternatively you can also use as.vector(coef(fit)) –  nico Apr 24 '12 at 17:16

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