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When running this program, sometimes the exception has a stack trace which originated one the line that begins "throw new Exception...", but occasionally it has a stack trace which originates at the first curly bracket of the Parallel.For's delegate. Why would it have that line number?

using System.Collections.Concurrent;
using System.Threading.Tasks;
using System;
public class J
{
    public static void Main()
    {
        ConcurrentDictionary<string, int> exceptions = new ConcurrentDictionary<string, int>();

        Parallel.For(0, 10, (i, s) =>
        { //this is line 55
            try
            {
                throw new Exception("blah"); //line 58
            }
            catch (Exception e)
            {
                string estring = e.ToString();
                exceptions.TryAdd(estring, 0);
                lock (exceptions)
                {
                    exceptions[estring] += 1;
                }
            }
        });

        foreach (var entry in exceptions)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("==============" + entry.Value + " times");
            Console.WriteLine(entry.Key);
        }
    }
}

And here is the weird output

==============3 times
System.Exception: blah
   at J.<>c__DisplayClass5.<Main>b__4(Int32 i, ParallelLoopState s) in Program.cs:line 55
==============7 times
System.Exception: blah
   at J.<>c__DisplayClass5.<Main>b__4(Int32 i, ParallelLoopState s) in Program.cs:line 58
Press any key to continue . . .

I modified code to include System.Threading.Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId before e.ToString(). I had to run it about 20 times before I was able to reproduce it generating the exception on line 55. From the output below, I can see that Goz was right; it was using the main thread (Thread ID 1) for some of the parallel tasks, but it had the right line number twice from the main thread and then the wrong number once from the main thread. So still mysterious.

==============3 times
5 - System.Exception: blah
   at J.<>c__DisplayClass5.<Main>b__4(Int32 i, ParallelLoopState s) in Program.cs:line 58
==============1 times
6 - System.Exception: blah
   at J.<>c__DisplayClass5.<Main>b__4(Int32 i, ParallelLoopState s) in Program.cs:line 58
==============2 times
1 - System.Exception: blah
   at J.<>c__DisplayClass5.<Main>b__4(Int32 i, ParallelLoopState s) in Program.cs:line 58
==============1 times
1 - System.Exception: blah
   at J.<>c__DisplayClass5.<Main>b__4(Int32 i, ParallelLoopState s) in Program.cs:line 55
==============2 times
4 - System.Exception: blah
   at J.<>c__DisplayClass5.<Main>b__4(Int32 i, ParallelLoopState s) in Program.cs:line 58
==============1 times
3 - System.Exception: blah
   at J.<>c__DisplayClass5.<Main>b__4(Int32 i, ParallelLoopState s) in Program.cs:line 58
Press any key to continue . . .

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Note: I thought maybe there was some JIT compiling weirdness happening, but I confirmed that isn't the case by changing the parallel-for to call a static method with the same body, and then adding this attribute to that method: [MethodImpl(MethodImplOptions.NoOptimization | MethodImplOptions.NoInlining)] So still a mystery. –  Anssssss Aug 14 '12 at 21:51

2 Answers 2

The breakpoint can be off if the .pdb file is out of sync with the .dll. Try a clean and rebuild. If that does not work, manually delete the files in windows explorer and build again.

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That wouldn't result in sometimes reporting one line and sometimes reporting another within the scope of a single execution of the program. –  Servy Aug 14 '12 at 20:52
    
@Servy - The OP said, "sometimes the exception has a stack trace ...". He does not define when or how. Where are you getting that information from? –  P.Brian.Mackey Aug 14 '12 at 20:54
    
I looked at the code of his program, to see what it is doing, and the output. There is only one place where an exception is ever thrown, one place where it is logged, understandable code for how it is logged, and an output which indicates, as I said in my comment, that the stack trace is different for 7 of the 10 exceptions thrown from the same line, in the same program. –  Servy Aug 14 '12 at 20:57

Parallel.For is a weird beast to debug. The line number you are seeing is referring to the lambda block itself (ie it happened somewhere in here).

Best I've ever managed to work out is that the line number depends on which thread throws the exception. It seems to be correct when the exception is thrown from the main thread ...

Would love a better answer than that though :)

share|improve this answer
    
You say "The line number you are seeing...", but there are two line numbers I'm seeing. None of the exceptions are thrown from the main thread. If there were an exception thrown from the main thread, it would not be caught anywhere, I'm only catching exceptions within the lambda that the Parallel For's threads execute. –  Anssssss Sep 17 '12 at 15:29
    
not all iterations of a parallel.for run on a different thread. Some of the iterations run on the main/calling thread. –  Goz Sep 17 '12 at 17:40
    
I tested it, and you're right, it was using the main thread some. However, your assumption about when the line number is correct wasn't always true. I was able to produce a case where the main thread reported the exception on line 55 (see edit to original post). –  Anssssss Sep 18 '12 at 19:41
    
@Anssssss: Interesting ... Parallel.For really is a pain for debugging :( –  Goz Sep 18 '12 at 19:46

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