Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

i have a class that has this function:

typedef boost::shared_ptr<PrimShapeBase> sp_PrimShapeBase; 



class Control{
     public:
         //other functions
         RenderVectors(SDL_Surface*destination, sp_PrimShapeBase);
     private:
         //other vars
          vector<sp_PrimShapeBase> LineVector;

};

//the problem of the program

void Control::RenderVectors(SDL_Surface*destination, sp_PrimShapeBase){
    vector<sp_PrimShapeBase>::iterator i;

    //iterate through the vector
    for(i = LineVector.begin(); i != LineVector.end(); i ++ ){
      //access a certain function of the class PrimShapeBase through the smart
      //pointers
      (i)->RenderShape(destination); 

    }
}

The compiler tells me that the class boost::shared_ptr has no member called 'RenderShape' which I find bizarre since the class PrimShapeBase certainly has that function but is in a different header file. What is the cause of this?

share|improve this question
    
Any particular reason you're separating the declaration of the iterator from its initialization? Do you need i later? Why not for (vector<sp_PrimShapeBase>::iterator i = LineVector.begin() or even better for (auto it = LineVector.begin()? –  FredOverflow Aug 14 '12 at 21:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Don't you mean

(*i)->RenderShape(destination); 

?

i is the iterator, *i is the shared_ptr, (*i)::operator->() is the object.

share|improve this answer
    
Weird, he had the parentheses, so it seems like he either mistyped (but then what would cause the problem, not sure)... –  Mehrdad Aug 14 '12 at 21:02
    
ofcourse, how pathetic to let that slip through. derefrencing the iterator. appreciated –  Unit978 Aug 14 '12 at 21:03

That's because i is an iterator. Dereferencing it once gives you the smart pointer, you need to double dereference it.

(**i).RenderShape(destination);

or

(*i)->RenderShape(destination); 
share|improve this answer
    
If only dereference was a postfix operator, then we could have written i*->RenderShape(destination); :) –  FredOverflow Aug 14 '12 at 21:02
    
Or some ungodly thing like i->->RenderShape(destination); –  Wug Aug 14 '12 at 21:03
1  
How about introducing some syntactic sugar like i-->RenderShape(destination);? The longer the arrow, the more dereference steps? :) –  FredOverflow Aug 14 '12 at 21:04
1  
++i++---->derp(); // wat –  Wug Aug 14 '12 at 21:07
1  
@Wug that's dongML, isn't it? –  sehe Aug 14 '12 at 21:10

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.