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How can I compare two OrderedDict dictionareis?

My structure is the following:

dict_a = OrderedDict([(1,4), (2,5), (3,3), (4,5), (5,4), (6,4), (7,4), (8,3), (9,4)])

dict_b = OrderedDict([(1,4), (2,2), (3,1), (4,4), (5,6), (6,7), (7,4), (8,2), (9,5)])

for values in score_dict.items():
if values == course_dict.values():
    print 'match!'
else:
    print 'No match!'

It iterates through and both lists are ordered so it should match on 1 and 7? Thanks in advance!

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2  
That's not how... anything works. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Aug 14 '12 at 21:36
    
Thanks for all the answers! Got it to work with Simeon's solution. –  Epalissad Aug 14 '12 at 22:04
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6 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can use items() and the built-in zip() function:

for i, j in zip(dict_a.items(), dict_b.items()):
    if i == j:
        print(i)

Output:

(1, 4)
(7, 4)
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1  
Thanks for demonstrating a good use of zip() –  Dave Nov 20 '13 at 13:49
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If you want the intersected elements that are the same at each ordered location:

>>> from collections import OrderedDict
>>> dict_a = OrderedDict([(1,4), (2,5), (3,3), (4,5), (5,4), (6,4), (7,4), (8,3), (9,4)])
>>> dict_b = OrderedDict([(1,4), (2,2), (3,1), (4,4), (5,6), (6,7), (7,4), (8,2), (9,5)])
>>> [i1 for i1, i2 in zip(dict_a.iteritems(), dict_b.iteritems()) if i1 == i2]
[(1, 4), (7, 4)]

If you don't care about ordering:

>>> set(dict_a.items()).intersection(set(dict_b.items()))
set([(7, 4), (1, 4)])
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>>> for x in dict_a.items():
    if x in dict_b.items():
        print(x)


(1, 4)
(7, 4)
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These are dicts. There's no need for a O(n**2) solution here. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Aug 14 '12 at 21:39
    
This doesn't preserve ordering though - not sure if that's what OP wanted or not –  jterrace Aug 14 '12 at 21:40
    
@jterrace: Yes it does. The result of items() is ordered. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Aug 14 '12 at 21:40
    
No, but it would match an item x in location i that is not in location i in the other dict –  jterrace Aug 14 '12 at 21:41
1  
@jterrace: "Items" of a dictionary are key, value pairs. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Aug 14 '12 at 21:42
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Assuming you want both keys and values to match, but are not concerned about position within each OrderedDict:

for k, v in dict_a.items():
  if v == dict_b[k]:
    print '(%s, %s)' % (k, v)
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If you want to include index in the OrderedDict as a part of the comparison:

>>> [a[0] for a, b in zip(dict_a.items(), dict_b.items()) if a == b]
[1, 7]

If you want to get all keys that have the same value in both of the OrderedDicts, regardless of order:

>>> [k for k, v in dict_a.items() if k in dict_b and dict_b[k] == v]
[1, 7]
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You could iterate over the items and print it if you find them equal.

In [10]: for a, b in zip(dict_a.items(), dict_b.items()):
   ....:     if a == b:
   ....:         print True
   ....:     else:
   ....:         print False
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