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I have some code that uses BSD sockets to grab a webpage from a server and writes it to a file. The following is the code that handles all the file I/O as well as the writing and reading with the sockets. Note that _sockfd is a valid socket between the talker and the listener:

    FILE* resultFile;
    resultFile = fopen(resultFilename.c_str(), "w+");

    if (resultFile != 0)
    {
        // Construct the request
        std::stringstream requestBuilder("");
        requestBuilder << "GET " << directory << " HTTP/1.1\r\nHOST:" << _hostname << "\r\n\r\n";

        std::string request = requestBuilder.str();

        // Prepare to read the file and write it out
        int bufferSize(1024);
        char buffer[bufferSize];
        int bytesRead(1);

        // Send request
        int bytesWritten = write(_sockfd, request.c_str(), request.length());
        if (bytesWritten < 0)
        {
            std::cout << "Error on initial request send" << std::endl;
            return false;
        }

        // Read response
        while (bytesRead > 0)
        {
            bzero(buffer, bufferSize);
            bytesRead = read(_sockfd, buffer, bufferSize);

            if (bytesRead < 0)
            {
                std::cout << "WebCrawler -> ERROR: Could not read properly from socket" << std::endl;
                return false;
            }

            fputs(buffer, resultFile);
        }

        fclose(resultFile);
        _socketUsed = true;

The result that I am expecting this code to produce looks something like the following snippet:

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">
<html>

<head>
<title>Serebii.net Pok&eacute;dex - #089 Muk</title>

<meta name="GENERATOR" content="Arachnophilia 4.0">
<meta name="FORMATTER" content="Arachnophilia 4.0">
<meta name="keywords" content="Pokemon, Pokédex, Muk (Pokémon),Muk, Diamond, Pearl, Platinum,     HeartGold, SoulSilver" />
<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" HREF="/style/dex.css">

</head>

<meta http-equiv="imagetoolbar" CONTENT="no">
    <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" HREF="http://www.serebii.net/spp-temp.css">
   <LINK REL="SHORTCUT ICON" HREF="http://www.serebii.net/favicon.ico">

<BODY  ondragstart="return false"  text=#000000 bottomMargin=0 bgcolor="#383838" 
leftMargin=0 topMargin=0 rightMargin=0>
    <table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" style="border-collapse: collapse"     bordercolor="#111111" width="100%" height="1" background="http://www.serebii.net/BannerBg.jpg">
      <tr>

But instead, it looks something like this:

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">
<html>

<head>
<title>Serebii.net Pok&eacute;dex - #089 Muk</title>

<meta name="GENERATOR" content="Arachnophilia 4.0">
<meta name="FORMATTER" content="Arachnophilia 4.0">
<meta name="keywords" content="Pokemon, PokÈdex, Muk (PokÈmon),Muk, Diamond, Pearl, Platinum,     HeartGold, SoulSilver" />
<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" HREF="/style/dex.css">

</head>


8c1
<meta http-equiv="imagetoolbar" CONTENT="no">
    <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" HREF="http://www.serebii.net/spp-temp.css">
   <LINK REL="SHORTCUT ICON" HREF="http://www.serebii.net/favicon.ico">

<BODY  ondragstart="return false"  text=#000000 bottomMargin=0 bgcolor="#383838" 
leftMargin=0 topMargin=0 rightMargin=0>
    <table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" style="border-collapse: collapse" bordercolor="#111111" width="100%" height="1" background="http://www.serebii.net/BannerBg.jpg">
      <tr>

As you can see, my code is somehow inserting strange characters (in this case, "8c1") into the result. I would like to emphasize that this happens multiple times throughout the entire HTML document. I simply limited myself to one example of it for brevity. I suspect I might be misusing the buffer somehow, but I have been unable to find a solution thus far.

Included in my prior efforts to solve my problem were the following SO questions:

C Winsock programming: input garbage

Raw Sockets : Receiver printing garbage values

I also referenced the following page to ensure I was doing C file I/O properly (I'm used to working with fstream in C++):

http://www.cprogramming.com/tutorial/cfileio.html

I am very inexperienced (as you can probably tell) with network programming using sockets, and I'm sure it's a silly mistake I'm making somewhere. To those much more experienced than I: even if you cannot point me directly to a solution, please share your thoughts on where I may have possibly erred. Sometimes all we need to find the answers are a few well-placed breadcrumbs. To that end, let me know if I'm showing the wrong code and/or you think another part of the code might be more helpful.

Additionally, this is my first SO question. Please critique it as you see fit to ensure my future questions are better and more appropriate for the site.

*UPDATE 1* (after Mark Ransom's suggestion to change fputs to fwrite):

I changed fputs(buffer, resultFile); to fwrite(buffer, 1, bytesRead, resultFile);. It is the more appropriate to use in this situation, I now see.

However, my problem persists. In fact, I find that after 5 consecutive executions of the new code (and my old code), the errant values I mistakenly referred to as "garbage" values in my original question are exactly the same each time. They're not at all random. I have changed the title of my question to more appropriately describe my problem.

After some more poking around, I would like to add that printing buffer to the console after the read produces the same results as the file write.

share|improve this question
    
You tagged this as "C", yet... std::string. Not C, this is C++ (regardless of the fact that you are using C style IO). –  Ed S. Aug 14 '12 at 21:50
1  
There's nothing wrong with your question here. You gave a nice small snippet of code that was representative of your issue, as well as "i expect this, but I got this" for output as well. Can't ask for much better really. Welcome to the site. –  Kevin Anderson Aug 14 '12 at 21:59
    
@Jared Friese Try attaching a debugger such as gdb or VS. You may want to see the value of bytesRead after each read. Looks like you got the socket programming down, just the binary file writing now. Good luck. –  MartyE Aug 14 '12 at 23:10

1 Answer 1

You're getting a buffer overrun in fputs(buffer, resultFile); because the write isn't stopping at the end of the buffer - it stops at the first zero character it finds, which is at some random spot in memory past the end of the buffer. Use fwrite instead.

share|improve this answer
    
Beat me to it. I had to look up fputs since I figured that was the issue. –  Kevin Anderson Aug 14 '12 at 21:57
    
@Kevin, it wasn't really necessary to look it up. The function doesn't have any parameters that would define the number of bytes to write, so the problem is obvious. –  Mark Ransom Aug 14 '12 at 22:03
    
@Kevin agreed /upvote. Worth also mentioning to explicitly check on bytesRead in the fwrite command. –  MartyE Aug 14 '12 at 22:22
    
Thank you for your answer, Mark. My problem, however, persists. See the above edit. –  Jared Friese Aug 14 '12 at 22:22

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