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We're building a database that will be used to check any duplicates on the current usernames being used by employees on the various systems of the company. Previously, some employees are sharing the same username access to some systems. Since the direction is to have a unique username for each employee on each system, we need to determine which employees are still using a shared access. The database has one table containing the names of the employees and their respective usernames.

Ex: Table1

Employee    System1 System2  System3
John Doe    dJohn   Pkls453  xfd801
Jane Doe    dJane   Pkls454  xfd801
James Lee   dJames  Pkls455  fd674
Mark Jones  dMark   Pkls453  xfd752

What we need to generate is a report indicating that John Doe and Jane Doe is sharing the same access on System3, and that John Doe and Mark Jones is sharing an access for System2. Something like:

Employee  System3  System2
John Doe  xfd801
Jane Doe  xfd801
John Doe           Pkls453
Mark Jones         Pkls453

Is there a way to pull this off?

Thanks in advance...

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1  
Are you sure names are unique? Please tell me you have a better unique identifier... –  Clockwork-Muse Aug 14 '12 at 22:13
2  
As always, keeping your actual RDBMS a secret does not help. The best solution directly depends on it. –  Erwin Brandstetter Aug 14 '12 at 22:16
    
Actually the employee's ID# is also part of the table (sorry, forgot to note it down on the original inquiry). It serves as the unique identifier for each entry... –  Arnel del Moro Aug 14 '12 at 22:24
2  
I ask again: please name the RDBMS (database system) you are using. There is no "universal SQL" like you seem to be thinking. None of the systems fully comply to the standard. –  Erwin Brandstetter Aug 14 '12 at 22:53

2 Answers 2

I'm sure there's a cleaner solution, but this should return what you're looking for in the format you specified.

SELECT Employee, System1, NULL AS System2, NULL AS System3
FROM your_table T1
WHERE EXISTS(SELECT * FROM your_table T2
         WHERE T1.System1 = T2.System1
         AND T1.Employee <> T2.Employee)
UNION
SELECT Employee, NULL AS System1, System2, NULL AS System3
FROM your_table T1
WHERE EXISTS(SELECT * FROM your_table T2
         WHERE T1.System2 = T2.System2
         AND T1.Employee <> T2.Employee)
UNION
SELECT Employee, NULL AS System1, NULL AS System2, System3
FROM your_table T1
WHERE EXISTS(SELECT * FROM your_table T2
         WHERE T1.System3 = T2.System3
         AND T1.Employee <> T2.Employee)
ORDER BY System1, System2, System3
share|improve this answer
    
+1 - For systems without the necessary windowing functions, this may be the only way to find the relevant information, without creating (extra, additional) duplicates in the result sets. You may either want to wrap the entire thing in an ORDER BY, or give each statement the relevant clause, so that the output will look like what the OP specified. –  Clockwork-Muse Aug 14 '12 at 22:29
    
Good point, I've updated the answer to include ordering. –  Jon Collins Aug 14 '12 at 22:38
    
@X-Zero: There are many ways to skin a cat with SQL. ;) –  Erwin Brandstetter Aug 14 '12 at 23:18

If your system supports window functions, this would work:

SELECT employee, system1, system2, system3
FROM  (
   SELECT employee
         ,system1
         ,cast(NULL AS text) AS system2
         ,cast(NULL AS text) AS system3
         ,count(*) OVER (PARTITION BY system1) AS ct
   FROM tbl1

   UNION  ALL
   SELECT employee
         ,NULL -- cast and column name only needed in first SELECT in Postgres
         ,system2
         ,NULL
         ,count(*) OVER (PARTITION BY system2) AS ct
   FROM   tbl1

   UNION  ALL
   SELECT employee
         ,NULL
         ,NULL
         ,system3
         ,count(*) OVER (PARTITION BY system3) AS ct
   FROM   tbl1
   ) x
WHERE  ct > 1
ORDER  BY system1, system2, system3;

Or, probably faster:
Note that "John Doe", sharing multiple systems, is only listed once in the following queries (as opposed to the first) with all his shared systems. Non-shared systems are set to NULL.

SELECT employee
      ,CASE WHEN ct1 > 1 THEN system1 ELSE NULL END AS system1
      ,CASE WHEN ct2 > 1 THEN system2 ELSE NULL END AS system2
      ,CASE WHEN ct3 > 1 THEN system3 ELSE NULL END AS system3
FROM   (
    SELECT employee, system1, system2, system3
          ,count(*) OVER (PARTITION BY system1) AS ct1
          ,count(*) OVER (PARTITION BY system2) AS ct2
          ,count(*) OVER (PARTITION BY system3) AS ct3
    FROM tbl1
    ) x
WHERE  ct1 > 1 OR ct2 > 1 OR ct3 > 1
ORDER  BY system1, system2, system3; -- depends on what you want

Or, if your anonymous system supports common table expressions:

WITH x AS (
    SELECT employee, system1, system2, system3
          ,count(*) OVER (PARTITION BY system1) AS ct1
          ,count(*) OVER (PARTITION BY system2) AS ct2
          ,count(*) OVER (PARTITION BY system3) AS ct3
    FROM tbl1
    )
SELECT employee
      ,CASE WHEN ct1 > 1 THEN system1 ELSE NULL END AS system1
      ,CASE WHEN ct2 > 1 THEN system2 ELSE NULL END AS system2
      ,CASE WHEN ct3 > 1 THEN system3 ELSE NULL END AS system3
FROM   x
WHERE  ct1 > 1 OR ct2 > 1 OR ct3 > 1
ORDER  BY system1, system2, system3; -- depends

If you have neither CTE nor window functions:
(Should work on all major RDBMS, including MySQL.)

SELECT t.employee, s1.system1, s2.system2, s3.system3
FROM   tbl1 t
LEFT   JOIN (SELECT system1 FROM tbl1 GROUP BY 1 HAVING count(*) > 1) s1
                                                 ON t.system1 = s1.system1
LEFT   JOIN (SELECT system2 FROM tbl1 GROUP BY 1 HAVING count(*) > 1) s2
                                                 ON t.system2 = s2.system2
LEFT   JOIN (SELECT system3 FROM tbl1 GROUP BY 1 HAVING count(*) > 1) s3
                                                 ON t.system3 = s3.system3
WHERE s1.system1 IS NOT NULL
   OR s2.system2 IS NOT NULL
   OR s3.system3 IS NOT NULL
ORDER BY s1.system1, s2.system2, s3.system3; -- depends

Tested with PostgreSQL 9.1.4.

share|improve this answer
1  
Hmm, I think I like your second edit the best, in terms of cleanliness (speed not likely to be an issue, given this should be largely a one-time charge). However, you may want to throw in an ORDER BY, to get the display the OP wants. –  Clockwork-Muse Aug 14 '12 at 22:28
    
Wow, that was a fast response! Thanks Jon and Erwin, i'll give your solutions a try when i get back at the office tomorrow..ü –  Arnel del Moro Aug 14 '12 at 22:38
    
@X-Zero: I added ORDER BY. Not entirely sure what the OP would want for query 2 and 3. –  Erwin Brandstetter Aug 14 '12 at 22:44
    
Okay, I'll have to admit, when I was contemplating JOINs, I didn't come up with that. –  Clockwork-Muse Aug 14 '12 at 23:54

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