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I'm using Entity Framework 4.3.1 Code First and I have something similar to the following:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        // get LogEntry with id x..
    }
}

public class MyContext : DbContext
{
    public DbSet<Log> Logs { get; set; }
}

public class Log
{
    public int LogId { get; set; }
    public ICollection<LogEntry> LogEntries { get; set; }
}

public class LogEntry
{
    public int LogEntryId { get; set; }
}

What's the best way to get a LogEntry object given an integer LogEntryId? Is it possible to get the entity directly without going via the Log.LogEntries property?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you have a reference to the context, then

var entry = context.Set<LogEntry>().Find(entryId);
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Any reason you don't have a DbSet< LogEntry > in your context?

If you did, you would be able to load it directly from the context.

public class MyContext : DbContext
{
    public DbSet<Log> Logs { get; set; }
    public DbSet<LogEntry> LogEntries { get; set; }
}

var logEntry = context.LogEntries.SingleOrDefault(le => le.LogEntryId == someLogEntryId);
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This didn't occur to me - can I just add as many DbSet<>s as I need even though one DbSet is a 'child' of another? –  Tom Hunter Aug 15 '12 at 8:38
    
Yup, you certainly can. It's pretty standard to add one for each table in your database. –  Marty Dill Aug 15 '12 at 14:40

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