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Assuming there are an arbitrary number of siblings of a node, and I wanted to select the nth sibling of that node, should I be using .next() chained up n times, or should I just use a single call to .nextAll(':eq(n-1)')?

Seems like there would be a lot of extra overhead with the former for large n, and possibly a bigger overhead with the latter for large number of siblings. I'm concerned with a case that involves n=2 and a large number of siblings, so I'm not sure if I want to use .next().next() or .nextAll(':eq(1)'). Does it matter?

Edit: For the case of n=2 and many siblings, it looks like .next().next() is fastest according to http://jsperf.com/next-next-vs-nextall-eq-1-vs-nextall-eq-1

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.nextAll('.bros').eq(4) for the 5th sibling or .nextAll()[4] would work equally well :) –  PhD Aug 14 '12 at 22:24
    
@thewiglaf: In relation to your last edit. Chaining next() is faster when you are looking for the 1st or 5th, 6th item. However, as you chain more and more next() calls .nextAll().eq(?) becomes progressivley faster. See this example comparing 10 chained next() to eq(10). next() chaining is now the slowest of the 3 tests!: jsperf.com/next-next-vs-nextall-eq-1-vs-nextall-eq-1/2 –  François Wahl Aug 15 '12 at 18:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here is a few test-cases for you to give you a general idea:

Also very interesting is the comparing of next() vs getelementbyid:

You can take any of those test-cases and add your own additional tests.

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Thanks for the response. Turns out .next().next() is fastest for many siblings according to jsperf.com/next-next-vs-nextall-eq-1-vs-nextall-eq-1 –  thewiglaf Aug 15 '12 at 18:16
    
@thewiglaf: Be very careful with that. Chaining next() is faster when you are looking for the 1st or 5th, 6th item. However, as you chain more and more next calls .nextAll().eq(?) becomes progressivley faster. See this example comparing chaining 10 next() to each other to eq(10). next chaining is now the slowest of the 3 tests!: jsperf.com/next-next-vs-nextall-eq-1-vs-nextall-eq-1/2 –  François Wahl Aug 15 '12 at 18:23

What you should do is pay a visit to http://jsperf.com. No need for either worrying or guessing.

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It turns out .next().next() is fastest when there are many siblings. Here is my test: jsperf.com/next-next-vs-nextall-eq-1-vs-nextall-eq-1 –  thewiglaf Aug 15 '12 at 18:13

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