Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So I can do Post.delete_all to delete all my posts, but what if I want to delete all posts, comments, blogs, etc. I.e., how do I iterate over all my models and run the delete_all method?

share|improve this question

11 Answers 11

up vote 41 down vote accepted
rake db:reset 

:) It recreates your table from migrations

Edit:

As suggested in the comments, a faster way to do it (but you have to add a new rake task) is:

namespace :db do
  desc "Truncate all tables"
  task :truncate => :environment do
    conn = ActiveRecord::Base.connection
    tables = conn.execute("show tables").map { |r| r[0] }
    tables.delete "schema_migrations"
    tables.each { |t| conn.execute("TRUNCATE #{t}") }
  end
end

Response copied from: answer on SO.

share|improve this answer
1  
Nice, though I'd prefer a method that doesn't require dropping and re-creating all the tables. –  Horace Loeb Jul 28 '09 at 19:27
2  
A faster, more precise way to just delete table rows is to use the TRUNCATE command: stackoverflow.com/a/6332189/109618 –  David James Jul 26 '12 at 2:18
    
This throws an exception when I try to run it, apparently, sqlite doesn't have a TRUNCATE command. –  ronan_mac Jun 8 at 18:18

If you're trying to do this from code instead of the command line, say from a Test::Unit::TestCase#teardown method, you could do either

class MyTest < Test::Unit::TestCase

  def teardown
    ActiveRecord::Base.subclasses.each(&:delete_all)
  end

end

or

class MyTest < Test::Unit::TestCase

  def teardown
    Rake::Task['db:reset'].invoke
  end

end

I warn you, though: neither is particularly fast. You're definitely better off with transactional tests if you can.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried this with Rails4 and curiously the data did not get deleted –  Besi May 12 at 18:45

If you simply want to start fresh with a fresh set of empty tables, you can first ensure you have an up-to-date definition of the schema in db/schema.rb:

rake db:schema:dump

and then:

rake db:schema:load

which has the effect of dropping tables and then re-creating them, without running through your entire battery of migrations.

share|improve this answer

you can have finer control with:

rake db:drop:all

and then create the database without running the migrations

rake db:create:all

then run all your migrations

rake db:migrate 

you can also do:

mysqladmin drop databasename
share|improve this answer
    
rake db:drop:all is exactly what I was looking for. Thanks! –  ShaChris23 Jun 6 '11 at 17:35
    
rake db:drop:all tried to drop production database for me. –  vaughan Jun 19 '13 at 4:20

A faster way to just delete table rows is to use the TRUNCATE command.

Many of the other answers seem to ignore the difference between deleting rows and dropping a table. Dropping a table destroys the table data and schema; meaning that you need extra steps to recreate the tables. Sean McLeary's answer was the best I saw, so I used it as a starting point. However, I think it is better to take advantage of the TRUNCATE command, because it should be faster and it also resets auto-increment keys. Also, using map instead of each shortens the code a bit.

namespace :db do
  desc "Truncate all tables"
  task :truncate => :environment do
    conn = ActiveRecord::Base.connection
    tables = conn.execute("show tables").map { |r| r[0] }
    tables.delete "schema_migrations"
    tables.each { |t| conn.execute("TRUNCATE #{t}") }
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
why delete "schema_migrations" ? –  nurettin Jan 29 '13 at 9:16
    
nurettin: deleting schema_migrations is not, strictly speaking, essential. However, after truncating tables you may have put your data into a state that is no longer navigable via migrations. So, deleting schema_migrations lets Rails restart the migrations from a known state. –  David James Jan 29 '13 at 20:40

You could list all the models in the seed-file (seeds.rb), and simply run

rake db:seed

The seed file would then look something like this:

Model1.delete_all
Model2.delete_all
Model3.delete_all
Model4.delete_all
Model5.delete_all
Model6.delete_all
Model7.delete_all

...

rake db:reset is too much for your job here. That will completely kill off your database and rebuild it from scratch, running all migrations etc. To run the seed command is faster.

share|improve this answer

I know this is an old question, but I thought this might be helpful to someone. This is a very fast way of cleaning out all data from a database.

tables = []
ActiveRecord::Base.connection.execute("show tables").each { |r| tables << r[0] }
tables = tables - ["schema_migrations"]
tables.each do |table|
  ActiveRecord::Base.connection.execute("DELETE FROM #{table} WHERE 1 = 1")
end

I use this technique in certain specs in an after(:all) block. This is much faster and more efficient than any of the Rails rake tasks for purging, migrating, reseting the database.

BTW: I'm pretty sure this would likely fail if you were enforcing foreign key constraints on the database side.

share|improve this answer

We have been remiss here at Stack Overflow for not mentioning the database_cleaner gem:

Database Cleaner is a set of strategies for cleaning your database in Ruby. The original use case was to ensure a clean state during tests. Each strategy is a small amount of code but is code that is usually needed in any ruby app that is testing with a database.

By 'strategy', Mr. Mabey means: truncation, transaction, and deletion.

ActiveRecord, DataMapper, Sequel, MongoMapper, Mongoid, and CouchPotato are supported.

Here is a quick code snippet from the Database Cleaner README:

require 'database_cleaner'
DatabaseCleaner.strategy = :truncation

# then, whenever you need to clean the DB
DatabaseCleaner.clean
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! Went through a lot of the answers here and this is the the one that did the trick. –  Uri Klar Jan 6 at 10:59
# fast truncation of all tables that need truncations (select is 10x faster then truncate)
# http://grosser.it/2012/07/03/rubyactiverecord-fastest-way-to-truncate-test-database/
def truncate_all_tables
  connection = ActiveRecord::Base.connection
  connection.disable_referential_integrity do
    connection.tables.each do |table_name|
      next if connection.select_value("SELECT count(*) FROM #{table_name}") == 0
      connection.execute("TRUNCATE TABLE #{table_name}")
    end
  end
end
share|improve this answer

This will work also for Rails 4

(ActiveRecord::Base.connection.tables - ['schema_migrations']).each do |table|
    table.classify.constantize.destroy_all
end
share|improve this answer
    
This worked fine for me, Rails 4, sqlite. Neat trick. Note however, it threw an error when it encountered my many_to_many table which isn't backed up by an AR model. I had to remove this from the tables array in the same way as is done for schema_migrations. –  ronan_mac Jun 8 at 18:22

Accepted answer with Postgres db:

namespace :db do
  desc "Truncate all tables"
  task :truncate => :environment do
    conn = ActiveRecord::Base.connection
    postgres = "SELECT tablename FROM pg_catalog.pg_tables WHERE schemaname='public'"
    tables = conn.execute(postgres).map { |r| r['tablename'] }
    tables.delete "schema_migrations"
    tables.each { |t| conn.execute("TRUNCATE \"#{t}\"") }
  end
end
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.