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While trying to make a response to this question, I've encountered some odd behavior from Perl's regex engine. I have a string that contains 2 quantities that I'm trying to match with a regex. The regex just matches any 8 characters before the string "units/ml". I want to grab both units.

This script only prints the 2nd one that is matched:

use warnings;
use strict;
my $line = 'some data 100,000 units/ml data 20,000 units/ml data';
my @array;
if ($line =~ m/.{8}units\/ml/g) {
    @array = $line =~ m/.{8}units\/ml/g;
    print join(' ', @array) . "\n";
}

Its output:

 20,000 units/ml

If I run line 6 twice, the line that assigns to @array:

use warnings;
use strict;
my $line = 'some data 100,000 units/ml data 20,000 units/ml data';
my @array;
if ($line =~ m/.{8}units\/ml/g) {
    @array = $line =~ m/.{8}units\/ml/g;
    # Let's run that again, for good measure...
    @array = $line =~ m/.{8}units\/ml/g;
    print join(' ', @array) . "\n";
}

Its output:

100,000 units/ml  20,000 units/ml

Why do these two scripts yield different results?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It's because of the /g modifier in your if. Since the if is evaluating the =~ in scalar context, it only gets the first item matched. Then, inside your if block, the @array assignment continues the search from where it left off. (This is useful for parsing.)

When you run the extra match, you've already finished matching everything in the string, so you start over from the beginning again, in list context, and you get everything then.

If you remove the g flag in your if, then things work as you expect.

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An option, in this case, is to evaluate the array assignment in the if statement:

use Modern::Perl;

my $line = 'some data 100,000 units/ml data 20,000 units/ml data';
my @array;
if ( @array = $line =~ m/.{8}units\/ml/g ) {
    print join( ' ', @array ) . "\n";
}

Output:

100,000 units/ml  20,000 units/ml

And appropriate action can be taken, if needed, if no matching occurred.

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1  
Yes, this is pretty close to what I'd do. However, you can put the my into the if statement: if (my @array = ... ) { @array valid here } but not here –  Tanktalus Aug 15 '12 at 15:09
    
@Tanktalus - Indeed, you can, and it was good to mention this. +1 –  Kenosis Aug 15 '12 at 16:05

The problem is here

if ($line =~ m/.{8}units\/ml/g) { ... }

a global match in scalar context will match the next occurrence of the pattern and set a mark to say where the next global match should begin

After that there is only 20,000 units/ml remaining that will match the pattern, so it matches only once

To collect all digits or commas in the string followed by units/ml you should write something like this

use strict;
use warnings;

my $line = 'some data 100,000 units/ml data 20,000 units/ml data';

my @array = $line =~ m|([0-9,]+)\s*units/ml|g;

print "$_\n" for @array;

output

100,000
20,000
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