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I'm converting a lot of code from VB.net to c# and here is another issue I think cropped up during the conversion.

if (sRow.Cells[1].Value == true)
    Worked = "X";
else if (sRow.Cells[2].Value == true)
    Vacation = "X";
else if (sRow.Cells[3].Value == true)
    Sick = "X";
else if (sRow.Cells[4].Value == true)
    Holiday = "X";

on each of the if / else / else if lines it gives me this error. I'm sure I am missing something that will force me to do a head bonk...

Error 7 Operator '==' cannot be applied to operands of type 'object' and 'bool'

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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Are you sure that these values are of type bool?

If so, just explicitly cast:

if ((bool)sRow.Cells[1].Value)
{
    Worked = "X";
}
else if ((bool)sRow.Cells[2].Value)
{
    Vacation = "X";
}
else if (sRow.Cells[3].Value)
{
    Sick = "X";
}
else if ((bool)sRow.Cells[4].Value)
{
    Holiday = "X";
}
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I assume that this is a cell of a DataRow which value is of type object. You cannot compare an object with a bool with the == operator.

So you should use the strongly typed Field extension of DataRow:

if(sRow.Field<bool>(1))
    // ...
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Error 7 Operator '==' cannot be applied to operands of type 'object' and 'bool'

That error is telling you that:

Operator '==' cannot be applied to operands of type 'object' and 'bool'

Value is of type object, so if you would like to compare them in that manner you will need to cast it.

So, make sure Value's underlying type is actually a boolean and then... dump the explicit comparison with true or false. It's debatable and stylistic, but seriously redundant and unnecessary. Would you ever say "if true equals true then..."? No, probably (hopefully) not.

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The pedantry is misplaced; you can actually compare with something meaningful, like "true" or "yes" (if the cell does, in fact, contain a string), or 1 or 0 if it is a number. See also programmers.stackexchange.com/q/12807 –  Robert Harvey Aug 14 '12 at 22:50
    
@RobertHarvey: It's not pedantry at all; comparing something which is already a boolean to a literal boolean in order to produce a boolean expression is redundant, in every sense of the word. I fail to see how your following statement is in any way relevant when we're talking about booleans (which we are): "you can actually compare with something meaningful, like "true" or "yes" (if the cell does, in fact, contain a string), or 1 or 0 if it is a number." –  Ed S. Aug 14 '12 at 23:07
    
See the link I posted. –  Robert Harvey Aug 14 '12 at 23:08
    
@RobertHarvey: I saw the link, though I'm not sure what you meant to prove by it. –  Ed S. Aug 14 '12 at 23:10
    
The use of == true is discussed in excruciating detail there. –  Robert Harvey Aug 14 '12 at 23:11
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