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I need to delete two blocks of text from multiple files. The two blocks are:

<sales_end_date>None</sales_end_date>
 ... some text
<unavailable_for_vod_date>None</unavailable_for_vod_date>

How would I properly do the equivalent of:

find ./ -type f -name 'xml' -exec sed -i 
    '**remove <sales_end_date>None</sales_end_date>' {} \;
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If you have XML files you should treat them like XML files. Someone with more experience can probably give you a solution using xmlstarlet. –  John Ledbetter Aug 14 '12 at 23:18
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5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I think you are looking for:

find . -type f -name '*.xml' -exec sed -i \
    -e '\@^<sales_end_date>None</sales_end_date>@d' \
    -e '\@^<unavailable_for_vod_date>None</unavailable_for_vod_date>@d' {} \;

But I wouldn't call this doing it properly. The -i option to sed is arguably never proper to use at all, and parsing xml with sed is rightly considered an abomination. However, this should do the job.

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Using XMLStarlet:

xml ed -d "*/sales_end_date[text()='None']" -d "*/unavailable_for_vod_date[text()='None']" your-input.xml

Example: Assuming your xml looks like this:

<here>
  <top_level>
    <something>1</something>
    <sales_end_date>None</sales_end_date>
    <unavailable_for_vod_date>None</unavailable_for_vod_date>
  </top_level>
</here>

Will output:

<here>
  <top_level>
    <something>1</something>
  </top_level>
</here>
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I can't test this right now because I don't have a bash command shell, but sed 's/before/after/g' is the foundation of what you're looking for. I've often done this with a bit of piping

#!/bin/bash
before_string1='<sales_end_date>None</sales_end_date>'
after_string1=''
before_string2='<unavailable_for_vod_date>None</unavailable_for_vod_date>'
for file in `find ./ -type f -name 'xml'`; do
    cat ${file} | sed "s/$before_string1/${after_string1}/g" > ${file}.tmp1
    cat ${file}.tmp1 | sed "s/$before_string2/${after_string2}/g" > ${file}.tmp2
    mv ${file.tmp2} ${file}
    rm -f ${file.tmp1}
done

You'll have to make sure none of your before or after strings use / or else you'll need to escape them, but I'm sure you have the bash scripting and sed skills for that.

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If None is inside of just those tags you want to remove, then you can use:

find . -name *.xml | xargs sed -ri 's/<.*?>None<.*?>//g'
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If you are luck, try this:

find -type f -name '*.xml' -exec sh -c \
    'grep -v "<sales_end_date>None</sales_end_date>" "{}" >/tmp/a; mv /tmp/a "{}"' \;

Notice: This command is only useful to remove entire lines, not some chars in a line.

You can make a little helper script process.sh to make your life easier:

#!/bin/bash
file="$1"
shift
tmp=`tempfile`
"$@" "$file" > $tmp
mv $tmp > "$file"

And then,

find -type f -name "*.xml" -exec process.sh {} grep -v "<sales_end_date>None</sales_end_date>" \;
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