Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

So, I'm trying to make a text based game in C++ Using Visual Studio 2010. Here are some of the code blocks that I think are related. If you need anymore, don't hesitate to ask me.

I'm trying to create a class for a game called places. I make a place, and it has another "place" to the North, South, East, and West of it. I'm just really confused right now. I'm a noob at this stuff. I may just be looking over something.

//places.h------------------------
#include "place.h"

//Nowhere place
string nowheredescr = "A strange hole to nowhere";
place nowhere(&nowheredescr, &nowhere, &nowhere, &nowhere, &nowhere); //Error occurs here
//

//place.h------------------------
#ifndef place_h
#define place_h

#include "classes.h"

class place
{
public:
    place(string *Sdescription, place *Snorth, place *Ssouth, place *Swest, place *Seast);
    ~place(void);
private:
    string *description;
    place *north;
    place *south;
    place *east;
    place *west;
};

#endif

//place.cpp-------------------
#include "place.h"
#include <iostream>


place::place(string *Sdescription, place *Snorth, place *Ssouth, place *Swest, place *Seast)
{
    description = Sdescription;
    north = Snorth;
    south = Ssouth;
    west = Swest;
    east = Seast;
}


place::~place(void)
{
}
share|improve this question
    
updated with @dasblinkenlight 's suggestion. – superzilla Aug 15 '12 at 2:49
    
@dasblinkenlight I'm getting this 4 times: "1>c:\users\jackson\google drive\public\c++ projects\parabellum\parabellum\places.cpp(5): error C2065: 'nowhere' : undeclared identifier" And for some reason your answer got deleted :( – superzilla Aug 15 '12 at 2:52
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Following syntax would solve the error

place nowhere = place(&nowheredescr, &nowhere, &nowhere, &nowhere, &nowhere);

That is explained in C++03 standard, 3.3.1/1

The point of declaration for a name is immediately after its complete declarator (clause 8) and before its initializer (if any)

In OP example, place nowhere(.....) represents a declarator, therefore nowhere used as a constructor parameter is considered undeclared. In my example, the place nowhere is a declarator and place(.....) is an initializer, therefore nowhere becomes declared at that point.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.