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First , let's see the code.

var a=0;
b=1;
document.write(a);
function run(){
    document.write(b);
    var b=1;
}
run();

I think the result is 01 .but in fact , The result is 0undefined.

Then I modify this code.

var a=0;
b=1;
document.write(a);
function run(){
    document.write(this.b); //or document.write(window.b)
    var b=1;
}
run();

Yeah, this time it runs as expected. 01 . I can't understand, WHY?

More interesting, I modify the code again .

var a=0;
b=1;
document.write(a);
function run(){
    document.write(b);
    //var b=1;       //I comment this line
}
run();

The result is 01.

So , Can anyone explain this?

Thanks for share your viewpoints. I simplify this code

b=1;
function run(){
    console.log(b); //1
}

two:

b=1;
function run(){
    var b=2;
    console.log(b); //2
}

three:

b=1;
function run(){
    console.log(b); //undefined
    var b=2;
}
share|improve this question
    
Note, the way I read this question originally was you were wondering why this.b works (as well as window.b), but but just plain b does not work before the var b... in the function. this and window are the same in that context. This could be confusing if you've seen objects created using functions and local scope, but that's because functions can be used as constructors. Also, the effect of a var statement "rising" to the top of the scope before execution is called hoisting. This is why var b... is local. –  Jared Farrish Aug 15 '12 at 2:37
    
See my comments: jsfiddle.net/userdude/NMxdU/6 You need a console open, like Firebug or Chrome console. –  Jared Farrish Aug 15 '12 at 2:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

When you refer to a variable within a function JS first checks if that variable is declared in the current scope, i.e., within that function. If not found it looks in the containing scope. If still not found it looks in the next scope up, and so forth until finally it reaches the global scope. (Bear in mind that you can nest functions inside each other, so that's how you get several levels of containing scope though of course your exmaple doesn't do that.)

The statement:

b=1;

without var declares a global variable that is accessible within any function, except that then in your first function you also declare a local b. This is called variable shadowing.

"But", you say, "I declare the local b after document.write(b)". Here you are running into declaration "hoisting". A variable declared anywhere in a function is treated by the JS interpreter as if it had been declared at the top of the function (i.e., it is "hoisted" to the top), but, any value assignment happens in place. So your first function is actually executed as if it was like this:

function run(){
    var b;              // defaults to undefined
    document.write(b);  // write value of local b
    b=1;                // set value of local b
}

In your second function when you use this.b, you'll find that this refers to window, and global variables are essentially properties of window. So you are accessing the global b and ignoring the local one.

In your third function you don't declare a local b at all so it references the global one.

share|improve this answer
1  
    
Thank you very much –  SeasonHuang Aug 15 '12 at 2:43

When you write b = 1, you're creating a property in the global object.
In an ordinary function, b will refer to this global.

Since your function contains var b;, b within the function refers to the local variable. (var statements create local variables throughout the function, no matter where the var is).
However, the executable portion of the var statement (b = 1) is only executed at that point.

share|improve this answer
    
But crucially, even though var b = 1; occurs after the document.write(), var b is defined in context of the function, still undefined until it is later initialized to 1. –  Michael Berkowski Aug 15 '12 at 2:12
    
It seems this doesn't answer the op's question. –  xdazz Aug 15 '12 at 2:13

The var directive is processed on the pre-execution stage, the b becomes local variable before document.write(b);, so at that time, b is undefined.

Note: assign a value to a variable is at the execution time, so you could image your code is like below.

function run(){
    document.write(b);
    var b=1;
}

is the same as:

function run(){
    var b;
    document.write(b);
    b=1;
}

Addtion:

This is why Put every var definition at the top of the function is good practice.

share|improve this answer
    
@JaredFarrish this in that function is window, and window['b'] is the global b. –  xdazz Aug 15 '12 at 2:24
    
In that case, the answer is hoisting. –  Jared Farrish Aug 15 '12 at 2:29
1  
"The code with this is very clear and no need to answer." - It's clear to the people who answered, but I don't know that it's clear to the OP, and it may not be clear to others who stumble upon this question later. Given the question boils down to "Which b is which?" some people might think this.b refers to the local b, especially since both the local and global ones are set to 1. –  nnnnnn Aug 15 '12 at 2:46

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