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I am designing tables for an ordering system for project management of large commercial construction projects. When entering a customer order, the customer has their original purchase order. Down the road the customer will make changes to the original PO by adding to the order or making changes. These changes I need to mark/track and number them as a change order on the customer order, but the original order needs to stay intact at the top of the order with its subtotal (to preserve the original quote/order), and any changes to be listed below as changes with their related pricing. Then there will be a new total at the bottom that would account for the original order and the change orders.

What are some ideas on how I can design the tables to track these changes separate from the original order items/total?

So far I have the tables: Customer, Order, OrderDetail, Product, etc.

EDIT: To hopefully clarify:

  • Customer places an order(Order table: OrderID, PO#, OrderDate, etc.)
  • The order has one to many line items (OrderDetail table: LineID, Qty, Description, etc)
  • An order can have one to many order changes.
  • An order change is just adding line items to the order, each order change (one or more line items) needs to be documented (as example "Change Order #1", "Change Order #2", etc) so that they can be referenced easily between the customer and my client.

Once the order is placed, if the customer wants to add to the order later, I see adding addition lines items to OrderDetail table.

So my client needs to be able lookup:

  • What items are on the original order, and what is the original order total.
  • What "Change Orders" have been made to the order, with each change order having its own date and price.
  • What is the new order total

My question is, can I just place the change order line items in with the same table, or a different table? How do I show what was part of the original order? How do I show what items are part of each change order?

Would it be best to use another table or two?

EDIT: Possible solutions
@Darklantern - Let me know if I understand your idea, it would look like this

Initial Order:
Order Header:
- Version = 1

Order Detail:
- Version = 1 Part = A
- Version = 1 Part = B

Order after change order has been added:
Order Header:
- Version = 2

Order Detail:
- Version = 1 Part = A
- Version = 1 Part = B
- Version = 2 Part = A
- Version = 2 Part = B
- Version = 2 Part = C

This would be great, but I to track what was only part of original order, what was only part of version 1, etc. Your idea looks good, but will not clearly show if "Version 2 Part B" was edited or not without comparing it to "Version 1 Part B".

I took your idea one step further. Will it work, or what flaws am I not seeing:

Initial Order:
Order Header:
- Date, etc

Order Detail:
- Version = 0 Part = A
- Version = 0 Part = B

Order after multiple order changes:
Order Header:
- Date, etc

Order Detail:
- Version = 0 Part = A
- Version = 0 Part = B
- Version = 1 Part = C
- Version = 1 Part = B Upgraded to D (price is the difference between B and D
- Version = 2 Part = A removed (price is a negative amount)

The concern then is how simple will reporting be? When printing out a purchase order or invoice, can I list each "version" with its own group header and subtotal? Because many times each "version" will have its own lot pricing.

Am I on the right track, or way off on a rabbit trail?

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3 Answers 3

Your question is too broad you may want to specify exactly what you want to achieve. For example, do you want a new row entered for modified items, then requesting the latest row version or do you want only 1 row for the item (modify this row as required) then put the change information into an audit table (front end coding). Look on the web for an ERD that may help you design this, I am sure this concept is not new. Examine Northwind/Pubs sample databases for some ideas.

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Sorry it wasn't clear. See above edits –  Tonya Aug 15 '12 at 4:39
    
I think 'whats best' will be determined by the size of the database how frequently it will be modified, etc... the normal on 'how long is a piece of string question. –  Darklantern Aug 15 '12 at 5:53
    
I think 'whats best' will be determined by the size of the database how frequently it will be modified, etc... the normal on 'how long is a piece of string question. Here is a couple of thoughts, 1) only logically delete any modified item, but version each iteration eg: the original order would have the latest version whilst order detail would have every change version (eg:v1, ve..v4). This way you can get the original version V1 or next V2 etc.... Or you are snapshot-ting the order. –  Darklantern Aug 15 '12 at 6:00
    
I won't be actually changing the original order line items. Any changes would be listed as a new change order. Pulling an example from a real order: the change order line item reads "Upsize RVSS from 10hp to 25hp". So if I need to track each change order (and all its line items) do I use another table? When creating reports for the whole order, will it make it more challenging to pull the data from separate tables? But if they are in the same table, do I keep them grouped using another field, like a lookup field? This all is what I am not sure of. –  Tonya Aug 15 '12 at 22:47

Hmm... I should get new glasses. What i would suggest is to leave the line items in one table. Add a VersionNumber to the Order and Line items, when an item is superseded increment all items (including new) to the new version (leaving the superseded item at its original version). The final order will have the header version = matching line item version. This is easier to report on.

You could normalise this by have an tblOrderVersion, with (Ident,Orderid,VersionNumber) where the line would get updated with the current version number. This would allow you to track every iteration of the order. If the table gets too large, it would be simple to remove redundant data into another table you could union to get required reports. I Hope i have helped if but a little. Also i think its rude to downvote someone without an explanation. (BTW i dint downvote you).

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This in an interesting way of looking at it, I hadn't thought of that. I have never had to version anything before. See the additional edit on my original post for clarification on your idea, and a variation of it that I came up with. –  Tonya Aug 17 '12 at 3:10

your first example was exactly what i was thinking. I see your second sample is a good variation but more complex to report on. Is the customer seeing everything in the invoice/order including all the changes? Or are you grouping this just for management, a management reporting tool? Are you tyying to create mock invoices for each version or do you want to demonstrate the whole order in a ledger style format. Thinking from the reporting (you dont say which tool is being used for reports) point of view the first 'version' is simpler and you could list by order detail/product which would allow for a quick comparison. You could create subtotals for each version. You certainly can create invoices/reports grouped on versions, but how do you mix items from different versions in each group, this can be complex to script. I will think about this more. Certainly if you are up to the scripting maybe version 2 is better.

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The example the user gave me had all line items listed on invoice/order, but grouped by original, change order #1, etc. The user wants to be able to summarize on each group so as to easily compare to what user is receiving and paying for. I will be building the tables in SQL Server, building the interface with LightSwitch, but I don't know yet what to use for reporting. I am fine with coding, but I don't want to make it so complex that the process as a whole becomes complicated and slow. I have a system I am converting from, but I am having to add quotes and order changes, as a start. –  Tonya Aug 18 '12 at 23:02

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