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This is not a question that can be solved by using ease-in.

If I have an element that I want to spin in CSS3 for a certain amount of time, but that starts off slow and ends slow, how can I do this?

CSS

@-webkit-keyframes spin {
  0% { -webkit-transform: rotate(0deg); }
  100% { -webkit-transform: rotate(360deg); }
}

div{
  background-image:-webkit-radial-gradient(center, ellipse cover, rgba(0,0,0,1) 0%,rgba(51,51,51,1) 20%,rgba(0,0,0,1) 20%,rgba(51,51,51,1) 40%,rgba(0,0,0,1) 40%,rgba(51,51,51,1) 60%,rgba(0,0,0,1) 60%,rgba(51,51,51,1) 80%,rgba(0,0,0,1) 80%,rgba(51,51,51,1) 100%);
  width: 200px;
  height: 200px;
  -webkit-animation-name: spin; 
  -webkit-animation-duration: 2s;
  -webkit-animation-iteration-count: 60.5;
  -webkit-animation-timing-function: ease-in;
}

HTML

<div></div>

I can't seem to figure out how to do this. My animation runs for a total of 121 seconds, since it takes 2 seconds for one spin to complete, so 60.5 spins will take a total of 121 seconds (if my math is incorrect, please tell me). This works fine, except that I want the div to start spinning off slow, then completed all 59 rotations, then end slow for the last one.

I'd like to use pure CSS for this, if possible.

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If you don't mind adding a little javascript, you can write 3 animations and listen to animationend event to change key frame names... –  Passerby Aug 15 '12 at 3:12
    
Is there anyway to do it without JS? :D –  Charlie Aug 15 '12 at 3:16
    
If it really has to be pure CSS...wrap 3 divs together and use 3 animations, one for out most div to spin the first round, one delaying a few seconds and spin the "in most" div for 59 rounds, and one delaying ~100 seconds and spin the middle div for last rounds. You'll have to do the math of course :) –  Passerby Aug 15 '12 at 3:49
    
Could you post an example.. :) –  Charlie Aug 15 '12 at 3:51
    
e.g. <div class="first_round"><div class="last_round"><div class="main_spin"></div></div></div>,in CSS, div.main_spin{animation-delay:3s;}div.last_round{animation-delay:100s;} –  Passerby Aug 15 '12 at 3:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Sorry that I don't have a JSFiddle...

Edit: I used a relative solution in my experiment: CSS3 Clock, could that count as a half fiddle? :D

Edit #2: JSFiddle provided by @Charlie: http://jsfiddle.net/7DPnc

If it really has to be pure CSS, I would suggest wrapping 3 divs together and spin them separately:

CSS

div.first_round
{
-webkit-animation-duration:3s;
-webkit-animation-iteration-count:1;
}
div.last_round
{
-webkit-animation-duration:3s;
-webkit-animation-iteration-count:1.5;
-webkit-animation-delay:100s; /* you'll have to do the math */
}
div.main_round
{
-webkit-animation-duration:2s;
-webkit-animation-delay:3s;
-webkit-animation-iteration-count:59;
-webkit-animation-timing-function:linear;
}

HTML

<div class="first_round">
<div class="last_round">
<div class="main_round">
</div>
</div>
</div>

Or if you don't mind using a little JS, listen to animationend event...

share|improve this answer
    
jsfiddle.net/7DPnc Shouldn't this be more fluid? –  Charlie Aug 15 '12 at 4:29
    
@Charlie OK you get the idea :) –  Passerby Aug 15 '12 at 4:40

You need 60 spins in 120 seconds right?

Lets first change the iteration count to 1.

-webkit-animation-iteration-count:1;

and the duration to 120 seconds

-webkit-animation-duration: 120s;

Now set the amount of spins. (360deg x 60spins)

@-webkit-keyframes spin {
  0% { -webkit-transform: rotate(0deg); }
  100% { -webkit-transform: rotate(21600deg); }
}

And now we'll modify that to set the timing. (shave a rotation off each side, add to new section)

@-webkit-keyframes spin {
  10% { -webkit-transform: rotate(360deg); }
  90% { -webkit-transform: rotate(20880deg); }
  100% { -webkit-transform: rotate(21600deg); }
}

Lastly, we set the easing function to linear in order to avoid the stop that will occur between keyframe sections if you use a curve. (replace with ease, ease-out, etc to see what I mean)

-webkit-animation-timing-function: linear;

You can easily tweak the timing by changing duration, and the keyframe percentages.

DEMO

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