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I know this question has been asked several times but the answers given don't help my situation.

I have a simple array that basically represent the month and year. The only purpose of the array is to keep track of events in a database and I need to know which months and years are represented. The array is basically:

$array[MONTH][YEAR] = 1; //just any value. Don't care about the value.

I need to sort the array so that the years are in order but also any months in the same year should also be sorted. See the output I want below...

$dates[10][2012] = 1;
$dates[1][2011] = 1;
$dates[12][2013] = 1;
$dates[4][2010] = 1;
$dates[6][2009] = 1;
$dates[7][2009] = 1;

How do I sort this array so that the values come back as:

Array
(
    [6] => Array
    (
        [2009] => 1
    )
    [7] => Array
    (
        [2009] => 1
    )
    [4] => Array
    (
        [2010] => 1
    )
    [1] => Array
    (
        [2011] => 1
    )
    [10] => Array
    (
        [2012] => 1
    )
    [12] => Array
    (
        [2013] => 1
    )
}

Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
    
either way, how do I sort it by YEAR, then month? –  pogeybait Aug 15 '12 at 3:40
    
I've updated my answer below to show how you would sort it if you changed the index order. I assumed you were locked into that order, but if you can change it to [YEAR][MONTH] instead it's really a lot simpler. –  DaoWen Aug 15 '12 at 7:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Try using uasort. You can write a custom function to sort on the inner keys rather than the outer ones.

EDIT:

It turns out that you need to use uksort if you want to sort the outer months as well. This seems to work:

uksort($dates, function ($a, $b) use ($dates) {
  $year = key($dates[$a]) - key($dates[$b]);
  $month = $a - $b;
  return $year == 0 ? $month : $year;
});

EDIT:

If you just change the index order like Jon suggested above it's a lot simpler:

$dates[2012][10] = 1;
$dates[2011][1] = 1;
$dates[2013][12] = 1;
$dates[2010][4] = 1;
$dates[2009][7] = 1;
$dates[2009][6] = 1;

ksort($dates);
array_walk($dates, ksort);

print_r($dates);
share|improve this answer
    
That is actually uksort for sorting by key –  Hameed Aug 15 '12 at 3:30
    
If I could figure out how to use these sort functions on this issue, I would have it made. Got an example of what you are talking about Hameed? –  pogeybait Aug 15 '12 at 3:42
    
@Hameed - I was thinking that we only needed to sort the keys on the inner arrays and could ignore the outer ones. I've edited my answer and added an example using uksort instead. –  DaoWen Aug 15 '12 at 3:45
    
Very close. The months are not in order; Here is what I got: $dates[2012][9] = 1; $dates[2012][8] = 1; // run your routine Array ( [2012] => Array ( [9] => 1 [8] => 1 ) ) –  pogeybait Aug 15 '12 at 20:45
    
@pogeybait - You're totally right. I didn't realize the months were already in order in the input. Apparently array_map wasn't doing what I thought it did. I've swapped it for array_walk and now it works as you'd expect. –  DaoWen Aug 16 '12 at 2:07

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