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can anyone explain why the output of

main()   
{   
    printf("hello ");   
    fork();   
    printf("hello ");   
}

is:

hello hello hello hello

and the output of:

main()   
{   
    printf("hello\n");   
    fork();   
    printf("hello ");   
}

is:

hello
hello hello

what difference does \n make w.r.t to buffer?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

When you fork the memory of the process is copied. This includes stdio buffers, so if the hello stays in the buffer it will be printed by both processes. Both processes go on about their business and eventually flush their buffers and you see "hello" twice.

Now on most implementations stdout is line-buffered which means a \n triggers a flush. So when the fork happens the buffer is empty. A sure fire way to prevent this would be to flush everything before forking.

EDIT

so why does the hello appears twice in the second line of second output

There are now two processes (parent & child) executing the same code so that printf is executed twice.

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so why does the hello appears twice in the second line of second output? –  akash Aug 15 '12 at 4:20
    
thanks a lot for this nice answer –  akash Aug 15 '12 at 4:30

While cnicutar's answer describes the mechanism behind what's happening in common implementations, the core issue is that your program is invoking undefined behavior. POSIX places rules on switching the "active handle" for an open file:

http://pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/9699919799/functions/V2_chap02.html#tag_15_05_01

fork is one situation where new handles for a file come into existence, and unless you have prepared for switching the active handle prior to fork, it's undefined behavior to use both of them after fork:

Note that after a fork(), two handles exist where one existed before. The application shall ensure that, if both handles can ever be accessed, they are both in a state where the other could become the active handle first. The application shall prepare for a fork() exactly as if it were a change of active handle. (If the only action performed by one of the processes is one of the exec functions or _exit() (not exit()), the handle is never accessed in that process.)

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In other words, the buffer needs to be empty -- ie: the handle needs to be flushed -- before forking, or it's UB. The \n triggers a flush, in the second example...but there's nothing doing so in the first. –  cHao Aug 15 '12 at 4:56
1  
The \n only triggers a flush if stdout is line-buffered, which only happens if you explicitly set it to line buffering or if it's a terminal. –  R.. Aug 15 '12 at 5:14

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