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This is a C# question using Visual Studio 2008.

I have an enum defined as follows:

public enum CrystalTypeEnum { Red, White, Blue, Green };

and I have a static function that returns the string representation of a given enum value:

    public static string toString(CrystalTypeEnum type)
    {
        switch (type)
        {
            case CrystalTypeEnum.Red:
                return "Red";
            case CrystalTypeEnum.White:
                return "White";
            case CrystalTypeEnum.Blue:
                return "Blue";
            case CrystalTypeEnum.Green:
                return "Green";
        }
    }

When I compile my code I get the following error:

CrystalType.toString(CrystalType.CrystalTypeEnum): not all code paths return a value

Why am I getting this error when clearly my switch statement covers all four cases (Red, White, Blue, Green).

Thanks!

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5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

If there is no default: control is transferred to outside of the switch statement (for values not handled by a case). This means if you don't have a default: then you need a return statement after the switch that returns a value of the type defined by the return type of the method.

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So in a switch statement default is always required? –  Jan Tacci Aug 15 '12 at 4:29
    
Interesting.... if i change the function to return nothing (void) then default is no longer required OR if I put a return statement (return null) at the end of the function default isn't required. –  Jan Tacci Aug 15 '12 at 4:32
4  
No, it's not required. But, there always has to be a path for non-handled values can go. This is because the compiler really doesn't check the values of enums. For example, you could call your method like this toString((CrystalTypeEnum)666) and it would still compile. Therefore you need either a default path, or code outside the switch statement that will compile. –  Peter Ritchie Aug 15 '12 at 4:34
    
Returning void means you don't need to return a value, and 'return;' is implied and thus no error. –  Peter Ritchie Aug 15 '12 at 4:35
1  
I got it... the compiler really isn't complaining about the switch statement not covering all values it's complaining that the function doesn't cover all cases (missing return statement). –  Jan Tacci Aug 15 '12 at 4:37

You need to specify a default section.

switch (type) 
{ 
    case CrystalTypeEnum.Red: 
        return "Red"; 
    case CrystalTypeEnum.White: 
        return "White"; 
    case CrystalTypeEnum.Blue: 
        return "Blue"; 
    case CrystalTypeEnum.Green: 
        return "Green"; 
    default:
        //return what you need here
} 
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Why do I need to specify default when all 4 cases are covered. The default statement will never be reached and the compiler probably removes it anyway. –  Jan Tacci Aug 15 '12 at 4:27
    
What would I return? Null? I don't like the fact that I have to explicitly return null even though it will never happen. Oh well. :D –  Jan Tacci Aug 15 '12 at 4:28
    
default is not always required, but in your case the function expects all code paths to return a value, and the switch allows for something to bypass the 4 cases. –  Adriaan Stander Aug 15 '12 at 4:31

Why am I getting this error when clearly my switch statement covers all four cases (Red, White, Blue, Green).

Because there are five cases in total not four. You can cast an integer that is not one of these defined enum values to CrystalTypeEnum type and it is still valid.

CrystalType.toString((CrystalTypeEnum)(42));

So in a switch statement default is always required?

No, you can place the return statement after the whole switch clause or anything as long as "all code paths return a value".

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Actually, there's 4,294,967,296 cases (4,294,967,297 if you include default:). enum members are just handy textual representations of certain values. An enum variable can have any value that the underlying type allows (default of int). –  Peter Ritchie Aug 15 '12 at 13:19

I know that the answer posted by astander, may be what you are looking for, but there is an elegnt way to do this, which wont require any switch statements.

You can use Enum.GetName method to get the string representation of an enum value. Please read here

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Wow thanks that is elegant! –  Jan Tacci Aug 15 '12 at 4:38
    
I don't know how to do that. :( –  Jan Tacci Aug 15 '12 at 4:41
    
There should be a 'check mark' beside each answer posted. Just click on it and the answer will be accepted. –  AYK Aug 15 '12 at 4:42
    
What if I just do type.ToString(); ? –  Jan Tacci Aug 15 '12 at 4:42
    
Enum.ToString() should also work for you. Refer : msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/a0h36syw.aspx –  AYK Aug 15 '12 at 4:44

Do not forget to use this section in switch\case construction:

switch (type) 
{
    default:
        throw new ArgumentException("Incorrect CrystalTypeEnum");
} 
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