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In python, is there a way to prevent adding new class variables after defining the object?

For example:

class foo:
    def __init__(self):
        self.a = 1
        self.b = 2
        self.c = 3

bar = foo()
try:
    bar.d = 4
except Exception, e:
    print "I want this to always print"

Alternatively, is there a way to count the number of variables in an object?

class foo:
    def __init__(self):
        self.a = 1
        self.b = 2
        self.c = 3
    def count(self):
        ...

bar = foo()
if bar.count() == 3:
    print "I want this to always print"

The only way I thought of doing this was using a dictionary or list:

class foo:
    def __int__(self):
        self.dict = {'foo':1, 'bar':2} 
        self.len  = 2
    def chk():
        return self.len == len(self.list)

However, doing this feels rather cumbersome for python. (obj.dict['foo']). I'd prefer just obj.foo if possible.

I want to have this so that I never accidentally declare a variable when I mean to change an existing one.

f = foo()
f.somename = 3
...
f.simename = 4 #this is a typo

if f.somename == 3:
    solve_everything()

Thanks in advanced.

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Thank you all for your prompt and helpful replies. –  d l Aug 15 '12 at 19:10
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7 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I suggest using __setattr__ to avoid the oddities of __slots__.

You always have to be careful when messing with __setattr__, since it takes care of setting all instance attributes, including those you set in __init__. Therefore it has to have some way of knowing when to allow the setting of an attribute, and when to deny it. In this solution I've designated a special attribute that controls whether new attributes are allowed or not:

class A(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.a = 1
        self.b = 2
        self.c = 3
        self.freeze = True

    def __setattr__(self, attr, value):
        if getattr(self, "freeze", False) and not hasattr(self, attr):
            raise AttributeError("You shall not set attributes!")
        super(A, self).__setattr__(attr, value)

Testing:

a = A()
try:
    a.d = 89
except AttributeError:
    print "It works!"
else:
    print "It doesn't work."
a.c = 42
print a.a
print a.c
a.freeze = False
a.d = 28
a.freeze = True
print a.d

Result:

It works!
1
42
28

Also see gnibblers answer that wraps this concept neatly up in a class decorator, so it doesn't clutter up the class definition and can be reused in several classes without duplicating code.


EDIT:

Coming back to this answer a year later, I realize a context manager might solve this problem even better. Here's a modified version of gnibbler's class decorator:

from contextlib import contextmanager

@contextmanager
def declare_attributes(self):
    self._allow_declarations = True
    try:
        yield
    finally:
        self._allow_declarations = False

def restrict_attributes(cls):
    cls.declare_attributes = declare_attributes
    def _setattr(self, attr, value):
        disallow_declarations = not getattr(self, "_allow_declarations", False)
        if disallow_declarations and attr != "_allow_declarations":
            if not hasattr(self, attr):
                raise AttributeError("You shall not set attributes!")
        super(cls, self).__setattr__(attr, value)
    cls.__setattr__ = _setattr

    return cls

And here's how to use it:

@restrict_attributes
class A(object):
    def __init__(self):
        with self.declare_attributes():
            self.a = 1
            self.b = 2
            self.c = 3

So whenever you want to set new attributes, just use the with statement as above. It can also be done from outside the instance:

a = A()
try:
    a.d = 89
except AttributeError:
    print "It works!"
else:
    print "It doesn't work."
a.c = 42
print a.a
print a.c
with a.declare_attributes():
    a.d = 28
print a.d
share|improve this answer
    
a.__dict__['d'] = 89 will of course still work. –  Duncan Aug 15 '12 at 7:52
1  
@Duncan Good point, but the objective here, according to OP, is to prevent creating new attributes by accident. I don't see how anyone can possibly write a.__dict__['d'] = 89 instead of a.c = 89 by accident. ;) –  Lauritz V. Thaulow Aug 15 '12 at 8:54
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In python, is there a way to prevent adding new class variables after defining the object?

Yes. __slots__. But do carefully read the notes.

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But that's not the intended use for __slots__ –  gnibbler Aug 15 '12 at 6:58
    
@gnibbler: Sure. But it's a powerful side effect. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Aug 15 '12 at 6:59
    
namedtuple would also be useful if a readonly object is required. –  jjia6395 Aug 15 '12 at 6:59
    
And if no extra methods are required. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Aug 15 '12 at 7:01
    
@jjia6395 OP doesn't want a readonly object. He wants to be able to change existing attributes, but not set new ones by accident. So namedtuple is out, since it's immutable. –  Lauritz V. Thaulow Aug 15 '12 at 9:05
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How about a class decorator based on lazyr's answer

def freeze(cls):
    _init = cls.__init__
    def init(self, *args, **kw):
        _init(self, *args, **kw)
        self.freeze = True
    cls.__init__ = init 

    def _setattr(self, attr, value):
        if getattr(self, "freeze", None) and (attr=="freeze" or not hasattr(self, attr)):
            raise AttributeError("You shall not set attributes!")
        super(cls, self).__setattr__(attr, value)
    cls.__setattr__ = _setattr

    return cls

@freeze
class foo(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.a = 1
        self.b = 2
        self.c = 3


bar = foo()
try:
    bar.d = 4
except Exception, e:
    print "I want this to always print"
share|improve this answer
    
If I had another upvote to give, it would be to you. Thanks for the clear use class decorators. –  d l Aug 15 '12 at 19:13
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  1. Preventing adding new attibutes using __slots__ class attribute:

    class foo(object):
        __slots__ = ['a', 'b', 'c']
        def __init__(self):
            self.a = 1
            self.b = 2
            self.c = 3
    
    bar = foo()
    
    try:
        bar.d = 4
    except Exception as e:
        print(e,"I want this to always print")
    
  2. Counting attributes:

    print(len([attr for attr in dir(bar) if attr[0] != '_' ]))
    
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use this to count no.of attributes of an instance:

>>> class foo:
    def __init__(self):
        self.a = 1
        self.b = 2
        self.c = 3


>>> bar=foo()
>>> bar.__dict__
{'a': 1, 'c': 3, 'b': 2}
>>> len(bar.__dict__)  #returns no. of attributes of bar
3
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Do you mean new class variables or new instance variables? The latter looks like what you mean and is much easier to do.

Per Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams's answer, __slots__ is probably what you want. Just do __slots__ = ('a', 'b', 'c') inside of your class and that will prevent any other attributes from being created. Note that this only applies to instances of your class -- class-level attributes can still be set, and subclasses can add whatever attributes they please. And he is right -- there are some oddities, so read the linked documentation before you start sprinkling slots everywhere.

If you aren't using slots, return len(vars(self)) works as a body for your suggested count method.

As an alternative to slots, you could define a __setattr__ that rejects any attribute not on a "known good" list, or to reject any new attributes after a frozen attribute is set to True at the end of __init__, etc. This is harder to get right, but more flexible.

If you actually want your instances to be completely read-only after initialization, and you are using a recent version of Python, consider defining a namedtuple or subclass thereof. Tuple subclasses also have some limitations though; if you need to go this route I can expand on it, but I'd stick with slots unless you have a reason to do otherwise.

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Suppose you now want your class to have a fixed set of both mutable and immutable attributes? I've hacked gnibbler's answer to make class attributes immutable after init:

def frozenclass(cls):
    """ Modify a class to permit no new attributes after instantiation.
        Class attributes are immutable after init.
        The passed class must have a superclass (e.g., inherit from 'object').
    """
    _init = cls.__init__
    def init(self, *args, **kw):
        _init(self, *args, **kw)
        self.freeze = True
    cls.__init__ = init

    def _setattr(self, attr, value):
        if getattr(self, "freeze", None):
            if attr=="freeze" or not hasattr(self, attr):
                raise AttributeError("You shall not create attributes!")
            if hasattr(type(self), attr):
                raise AttributeError("You shall not modify immutable attributes!")
        super(cls, self).__setattr__(attr, value)
    cls.__setattr__ = _setattr

    return cls

And an example:

@frozenclass
class myClass(object):
    """ A demo class."""
    # The following are immutable after init:
    a = None
    b = None
    c = None

    def __init__(self, a, b, c, d=None, e=None, f=None):
        # Set the immutable attributes (just this once, only during init)
        self.a = a
        self.b = b
        self.c = c
        # Create and set the mutable attributes (modifyable after init)
        self.d = d
        self.e = e
        self.f = f
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I posted the above from work, where personal logins are not allowed on company systems. Is there a way I can associate that post with this, my real StackOverflow login? –  BobC Sep 27 '12 at 3:19
    
Next step: Add iterator support. Since the attribute set is fixed, we should be able to add many namedtuple capabilities. Let this decorator create the classy love child of namedtuple and dict. –  BobC Sep 27 '12 at 4:40
    
The presence of __init__() seems gratuitous: It's just boilerplate that can be generated. Why not make a decorator for a function instead? It would be reminiscent of this comment in an ActiveState recipe (code.activestate.com/recipes/500261-named-tuples/#c16). The function parameters would become the mutable attributes, and locals would become the immutable attributes. –  BobC Sep 27 '12 at 5:16
    
One more change: Make the python enum metaphor (define a class containing only class attributes) have real const entries if it is instantiated: Replace: _init = cls.__init__ With: if not hasattr(cls, '__init__'): def _init():pass; else: _init = cls.__init__ –  BobC Sep 27 '12 at 17:51
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