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I am trying to write a function that creates a contiguous block of memory and assigns it to a 3d array. The code works in that it allows me to use the memory, and, when I use data stored in objects created with this function, the results appear correct. However, when I try to free the memory I have allocated with this function, I immediately get a glibc error. Here is the function:

void *** matrix3d(int size, int rows, int cols, int depth) {
    void ***result;

    int col_size = depth * size;
    int row_size = (sizeof(void *) + col_size) * cols;
    int data_size = (rows * cols * depth + 1) * size;
    int pointer_size = rows * sizeof(void **) + cols * sizeof(void *);
    int i, j;
    char *pdata, *pdata2;

    if((result = (void ***) malloc(pointer_size + data_size)) == NULL)
            nerror("ERROR: Memory error.\nNot enough memory available.\n", 1);

    pdata = (char *) result + rows * sizeof(void **);

    if((long) pdata % (col_size + sizeof(void *)))
            pdata += col_size + sizeof(void *) - (long) pdata % (col_size + sizeof(void *));

    for(i = 0; i < rows; i++) {
            result[i] = pdata;

            pdata2 = pdata + cols * sizeof(void *);

            for(j = 0; j < cols; j++) {
                    result[i][j] = pdata2;
                    pdata2 += col_size;
            }

            pdata += row_size;
    }

    return result;
}

It is called in this manner:

double ***positions = (double ***) matrix3d(sizeof(double), numResidues, numChains, numTimesteps);

for(i = 0; i < numResidues; i++)
    for(j = 0; j < numChains; j++)
        for(k = 0; k < numTimesteps; k++)
             positions[i][j][k] = 3.2;

free(positions);

What have I done wrong? Thank you for the help.

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1  
We cannot replay your error remotely; what is the error message you are getting? PS - casting the return from malloc is ugly as hell –  tbert Aug 15 '12 at 6:34
1  
glibc detects that you're casting the return value of malloc and punishes you. –  user529758 Aug 15 '12 at 6:37
1  
The error is probably in the code you've replaced with ..... Can you give us complete, compilable code that replicates the error? (Or just run your code under valgrind.) –  David Schwartz Aug 15 '12 at 6:42
1  
link in Electric Fence with -lefence . You may have to install Electric Fence first. It will find where you overwrite memory in many cases. –  Prof. Falken Aug 15 '12 at 6:46
1  
That's enough to replicate the error. The memory allocated is too small and you are writing outside its bounds. See my answer. –  David Schwartz Aug 15 '12 at 6:53

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Please excuse my dear Aunt Sally.

int data_size = (rows * cols * depth + 1) * size;

This should be:

int data_size = (rows * cols * (depth + 1)) * size;

Running the code under valgrind identified the error immediately.

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What version of valgrind are you using? Any fancy options? Because I used it and it gave me nothing. It said 0 errors from 0 contexts, which is obviously wrong because your fix works perfectly (thanks). –  wolfPack88 Aug 15 '12 at 6:57
1  
No special options. The key detail was ` Address 0x4c41750 is 0 bytes after a block of size 5,904 alloc'd`. (By the way, you really shouldn't write code like this unless you really have to. Just use separate blocks.) –  David Schwartz Aug 15 '12 at 7:00
    
I probably don't really have to in this particular case, but there are times when having a contiguous block of memory is absolutely necessary. Out of curiosity, though, why would you recommend against this type of code? It doesn't detract from anything, does it? –  wolfPack88 Aug 15 '12 at 7:10
1  
It's very, very hard to understand and debug. –  David Schwartz Aug 15 '12 at 7:28

What have I done wrong?

Your code is hard to follow (you're playing with pdata a lot) but 99% you're writing past the allocated space and you're messing up the bookkeeping left by glibc.

I can use the data I've written just fine. The only issue is when I try to use free.

That's because glibc only gets a chance to see you messed up when you call it.

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I thought that at first as well, but that does not seem to be the issue, since, as I mentioned, I can use the data I've written just fine. The only issue is when I try to use free. –  wolfPack88 Aug 15 '12 at 6:37
1  
@wolfPack88: One has nothing to do with the other. That you can use the data you've written just fine doesn't mean it's inside the block you allocated. –  David Schwartz Aug 15 '12 at 6:39
1  
@wolfPack88 Where does it get the size of the allocated block ? Maybe it's stored somewhere adjacent to the allocated memory ? –  cnicutar Aug 15 '12 at 6:41
1  
@wolfPack88: You'd get the error in free because that's the first chance the memory management code has to report an error. Yes, free deallocates the memory previously allocated, so if you've tampered with any memory that's not yours (for example, overwriting the structures the memory manager relies on), that's when you'll find out about it. –  David Schwartz Aug 15 '12 at 6:43
1  
To support cnicutar's conjecture that writing past the allocated memory of pdata may corrupt the metadata used by free stackoverflow.com/questions/1957099/… –  hhafez Aug 15 '12 at 6:47

What you are doing is one single allocation and then casting it to a tripple-pointer, meaning you have to deal a lot with offsets.

It would probably be better to a larger number of allocations:

char ***result = malloc(sizeof(char **) * rows);

for(i = 0; i < rows; i++) {
    result[i] = malloc(sizeof(char *) * cols);

    for(j = 0; j < cols; j++) {
        result[i][j] = malloc(sizeof(char) * size);

        /* Copy data to `result[i][j]` */
    }
}

When freeing, you have to free all of the allocations:

for(i = 0; i < rows; i++) {
    for(j = 0; j < cols; j++) {
        free(result[i][j]);
    }

    free(result[i]);
}

free(result);
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things like this are magnificant candidates to get things wrong

pdata = (char *) result + rows * sizeof(void **);

there is no reason at all to circumvent the address computation that the compiler does for you.

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